A Russian national flag is seen atop of the Grand Kremlin Palace an hour before Russian President Vladimir Putin addressed the Federal Assembly in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014
A Russian national flag is seen atop of the Grand Kremlin Palace an hour before Russian President Vladimir Putin addressed the Federal Assembly in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Russia is now requiring users of public Wi-Fi networks to provide identification in order to connect.

The move, announced Friday, is generating anger among users.

The order is the latest in a series of new laws tightening Russia's control over the Internet.

The Communications Ministry says the decree applies to "collective access points."

But it remains unclear how it will be enforced and which types of public places will be affected. Russian media list cafes and parks as examples.

Wi-Fi users will reportedly have to give their full names, confirmed by an ID, such as a phone number.

Another recent law in Russia requires bloggers with more than 3,000 followers to register with the government and adhere to the same rules as media outlets.