FILE - An employee organises bouquets of flowers to be exported overseas, ahead of Valentine's Day, at Discovery Farm in Facatativa, Colombia, Feb. 8, 2018.
FILE - An employee organises bouquets of flowers to be exported overseas, ahead of Valentine's Day, at Discovery Farm in Facatativa, Colombia, Feb. 8, 2018.

A Maryland mom took the Valentine's Day tradition of providing her son cards for his classmates to a new level this week: She scouted his college campus for a girlfriend.

Wearing a multicolored scarf, the 50-something woman approached students in two buildings on Towson University's campus this week, showing them a picture of her son on her cell phone and asking if they would date him, according to campus police reports.

Not everyone thought it was charming. As first reported by the Baltimore Sun, police sent an email to the campus community, asking them for information on the woman.

"HELP US IDENTIFY," highlighted in red, is written above a surveillance footage screenshot of the woman on campus released by university police.

Police said that the woman was not being sought on criminal charges, but they wanted her to just stop, according to the Baltimore Sun.

"This incident advisory is being provided in order to make the TU Community aware of an incident on campus that may cause concern," Charles Herring, chief of the university police department, wrote in an email to the campus community. "This advisory is intended to heighten awareness and inform the community of incidents that may impact their safety and security."

The incident is, of course, far from the first case of a mother publicly vouching for her son and his dating life.

Last October, Navy veteran Pieter Hanson's mother tweeted a photo of him in his uniform with the text "This is MY son... He is a gentleman who respects women. He won't go on solo dates due to the current climate of false sexual accusations by radical feminists with an axe to grind. I VOTE. #HimToo."

Pieter didn't agree with his mom speaking for him politically and created the Twitter handle "ThatWasMyMom" to denounce the #HimToo platform that tries to diminish the #MeToo movement in which women publicly name those who have assaulted or harassed them, often in professional settings.

Pieter gained 170,000 likes for tweeting a photo of himself and explaining that he believes women who come forward. Pieter now mostly tweets photos of his cats.

 

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