Sheriff Scott Israel speaks to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission on Nov. 15, 2018, Sunrise, Florida.
Sheriff Scott Israel speaks to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission on Nov. 15, 2018, Sunrise, Florida.

A report released by a special safety commission in Parkland, Fla. — the site of a high school shooting last year — recommended arming teachers to secure schools.

On Feb. 14, 2018, a shooter killed 17 people with a semiautomatic AR-15 rifle. While the massacre drew national attention to the larger question of gun control in the United States, it also prompted a months-long local investigation into how the shooter was able to perpetrate the mass slaying, and how similar events may be prevented in the future.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission released over 400 pages covering details of the shooting, identifying security problems and making recommendations.

Screenshot of Parkland student anti-gun violence march arriving in Newtown.
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Among the recommendations was the expansion of a program that allows teachers and staff members to carry concealed firearms to defend students in the event of an active shooter.

"School districts and charter schools should permit the most expansive use of the Guardian Program under existing law to allow personnel — who volunteer, are properly selected, thoroughly screened and extensively trained — to carry concealed firearms on campuses for self-protection and the protection of other staff and students," the report read.

The current Guardian Program, signed into law by outgoing Republican Gov. Rick Scott shortly after the shooting last year, currently only allows administrators or non-teaching staff to receive firearm training.

Broward County School Superintendent Robert Runcie
Broward County School Superintendent Robert Runcie stands at the podium during a meeting of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission on Nov. 15.

In April 2018, the Broward County School Board voted against adopting the program, which would have given Broward County schools over $67 million to train and arm teachers, according to the Eagle Eye, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School's newspaper.

This week's report also recommended a full internal investigation of the Broward County sheriff's office, which responded first to the shooting, to "address all of the actions or inactions of personnel on February 14th, 2018.”

The committee, which includes sheriffs, state politicians and parents of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas victims, among others, first met in April 2018, setting January 2019 as its deadline to submit a preliminary report. During the second half of 2018, the commission held monthly meetings interviewing witnesses and reviewing "a massive amount of evidence," according to the report.

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