This image made from video of a fake clip featuring former president Barack Obama shows elements of facial mapping used in new technology that lets anyone make videos of real people appearing to say things they've never said.
This image made from video of a fake clip featuring former president Barack Obama shows elements of facial mapping used in new technology that lets anyone make videos of real people appearing to say things they've never said.

WASHINGTON - Three lawmakers want to see a U.S. intelligence assessment of the threat posed by technology that lets anyone make fake but realistic videos of real people saying things they never said.

The rising capabilities of the technology are fueling concerns it could be used to make a bogus video, for example, of an American politician accepting a bribe or of a U.S. or foreign leader warning of an impending disaster.

The lawmakers wrote National Intelligence Director Dan Coats on Thursday asking for a report by mid-December that assesses how the bogus high-tech videos, known as deepfakes, could threaten U.S. national security.

Democratic Reps. Adam Smith of California and Stephanie Murphy of Florida and Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo of Florida say they worry adversaries will use the fake videos to undermine American democracy.