Alma Morales Rosario poses for a portrait between the beams of her home being rebuilt after it was destroyed by Hurricane Maria one year ago in the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Sept. 8, 2018.
Alma Morales Rosario poses for a portrait between the beams of her home being rebuilt after it was destroyed by Hurricane Maria one year ago in the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Sept. 8, 2018.

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - A study has found that the bulk of federal funds slated for post-hurricane reconstruction efforts in Puerto Rico are going to mainland companies, despite a federal law that states local companies should receive priority.

The Center for a New Economy said Wednesday that of the nearly $5 billion awarded by the U.S. government by late August for work in Puerto Rico, nearly $4.3 billion has been awarded to mainland U.S. firms and less than 10 percent to Puerto Rico companies. The think tank analyzed a federal database of post-hurricane contracts.
 
The study also found that the U.S. spent almost $12 billion in the first 336 days after Hurricane Katrina, more than double spent in contracts post-Maria in Puerto Rico.
 
FEMA did not immediately respond to a request for comment.