FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2016 file photo, Libertarian vice presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld arrives to cast his vote at the John F. Kennedy Elementary School in Canton, Mass.
FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2016 file photo, Libertarian vice presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld arrives to cast his vote at the John F. Kennedy Elementary School in Canton, Mass.

BOSTON - Former Massachusetts Gov. William Weld has changed his party registration from Libertarian back to Republican as he mulls a possible primary challenge against President Donald Trump.

FILE - President Donald Trump points to a supporter as he departs a rally at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Miss., Nov. 26, 2018. Trump’s campaign has launched a state-by-state effort to prevent an intraparty fight that could spill over in
Trump Campaign Takes Steps to Prevent a Challenge Within GOP

Worried about a potential Republican primary challenge, President Donald Trump's campaign has launched a state-by-state effort to prevent an intraparty fight that could spill over into the general-election campaign.

The nascent initiative has been an intense focus in recent weeks and includes taking steps to change state party rules, crowd out potential rivals and quell any early signs of opposition that could embarrass the president.
 
It is an acknowledgment that Trump, who effectively hijacked the Republican Party in 2016, hasn't completely cemented his grip on the GOP and, in any event, is

Weld served as a Republican governor from 1991 until 1997. He later became a Libertarian and ran for vice president on a ticket with former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson in the 2016 election.

The clerk's office in Canton, Massachusetts, confirms on Tuesday that Weld recently changed his party registration to the GOP.
 
If he runs for president as a Republican, he could be Trump's first challenger within the party.

FILE - Kelly Monroe, investigator with the Georgia Secretary of State office (L) takes a look at a new voting machine that produces a paper record being tested at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
US: No Evidence Foreign Meddling Impacted 2018 Election

Top U.S. officials said on Tuesday that foreign actors did not significantly influence the 2018 congressional elections, despite reports of hacking attempts leading up to the November election.

The statement by the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security stands in contrast to the 2016 presidential election, which U.S. officials say was the target of a sophisticated Russian hacking and propaganda campaign.

The two agencies said the U.S.

Weld has not returned messages from The Associated Press. He recently told WMUR-TV in New Hampshire that he would discuss his potential political plans during a Feb. 15 visit to the first primary state.