President Donald Trump arrives to speak at a campaign rally, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Macon, Ga.
President Donald Trump arrives to speak at a campaign rally, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Macon, Ga.

A big group of migrants from Central American countries traveling mostly on foot toward the United States, voted to continue their journey from Cordoba to reach  Mexico City on Monday.

They have decided to hitchhike and walk to cover the shortest route from Cordoba, which is more than 280 kilometers south of Mexico’s capital.

The vote Sunday came after exhausted caravan participants arrived in Cordoba after a 200-kilometre trek through Veracruz, a state which has been life threatening for hundreds of migrants in recent years, because of kidnappers looking for ransom payments.

Central American migrants pack into the back of a
Central American migrants pack into the back of a trailer truck as they begin their morning trek as part of a thousands-strong caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, in Isla, Veracruz state, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018.

The caravan with an estimated 4,000 migrants is still in Veracruz, still hundreds of kilometers from the nearest U.S. border crossing.

Meanwhile, the Central American migrant caravans were on the minds of President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama on the last Sunday of campaigning before Tuesday's mid-term election.

Trump came out for a rally in Macon, Georgia for Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate for governor.

He gave what he called message to the migrants hoping to cross the border from Mexico.

"Turn back now because you're not coming into the United States unless you go through the process."

Migrants, part of a caravan traveling from Central
Migrants, part of a caravan traveling from Central America toward the United States, walk on a road that links Ciudad Hidalgo with Tapachula, Mexico, Nov. 2, 2018.

Trump again said the caravans are full of criminals and "rough people," although reporters who have traveled with the migrants say they have primarily seen women and children.

The president said deploying U.S. soldiers to the border shows the United States is "not playing games."

Just before Trump spoke, his predecessor, President Barack Obama, campaigned in Gary, Indiana for Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly.

In a voice hoarse from several days of campaign speeches, Obama criticized Trump's belief that the migrants are an invasion and a threat. He said the men and women in the military deserve better than to be used for what he called a "political stunt."

Former President Barack Obama, right, greets Democ
Former President Barack Obama, right, greets Democratic supporters at Genesis Convention Center, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Gary, Ind.

Earlier Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the deployment of thousands of U.S. troops to the Mexican border has nothing to do with boosting Republicans days before the election.

"I've been involved in scores of conversations about stopping illegal immigration from Mexico and never once has there been a discussion of the political impact in U.S. domestic politics," he told CBS's Face the Nation.

The main migrant caravan that left San Pedro Sula, Honduras about three weeks ago is still about 1,600 kilometers from the U.S.-Mexican border. The majority say they still hope to be able to get into the U.S. and work, while others have accepted Mexico's offer of asylum and jobs.

Two other smaller caravans are also slowly making their way north.