Two men wearing skullcaps as they listen to the speech of Israeli Historian Saul Friedlaender, during a remembrance event of the parliament Bundestag to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust at the Reichstag building in Berlin, Germany, Jan. 31, 2...
Two men wearing skullcaps as they listen to the speech of Israeli Historian Saul Friedlaender, during a remembrance event of the parliament Bundestag to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust at the Reichstag building in Berlin, Germany, Jan. 31, 2...

IIsraeli President Reuven Rivlin says he is shocked Germany has told Jews it could be dangerous in some parts of the country to wear religious skullcaps in public.

"Fears about the security of German Jews are a capitulation to anti-Semitism and an admittance that again, Jews are not safe on German soil," Rivlin tweeted Sunday.

He added that the welfare, rights and religious freedom of every member of the German Jewish community is the responsibility of the German government and its police.

Germany's anti-Semitism commissioner said in an interview with German press Saturday that he cannot advise Jews to wear the skullcaps, also called a kippah and yarmulke, "everywhere all the time in Germany."

He did not specify which parts of the country he makes his recommendation.

But Bavaria's state interior minister Joachim Herrmann said, "Everyone can and should wear his skullcap wherever and whenever he wants."

Klein said, “The lifting of inhibitions and the uncouthness which is on the rise in society" has contributed to the growing number of attacks. "The internet and social media have largely contributed to this, but so have constant attacks against our culture of remembrance."

Commissioner Klein blames the far right for most anti-Semitic attacks.
 
The German government reported a rise in anti-Semitic crimes and attacks on foreigners last year.