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Analyst Credits Technology for Progress in Boston Bombing Case

  • Ashenafi Abedje

A US-based security analyst says he is not surprised by the latest developments in the Boston bombing case. One of the two suspects, Tamerlan Tsarneav, was killed following a shootout early Friday. A massive manhunt continues for the other suspect, Dzhokar Tsarnaev.

David Sutter, a senior fellow at the Washington-based Hudson Institute, credits modern communication tools for the progress security officials are making in the case.

“It was not surprising that they were identified because the modern age is such that everyone has cell phones, video surveillance….it’s very difficult in a public place to commit a crime without been seen,” he says.

So how could two young people amass so many explosives without anybody noticing? Sutter says they may not be acting alone, and that the bombing could be part of a wider conspiracy.

He also offers a second explanation.

“Sadly in the United States, it is possible to amass a lot of weaponry and ammunition without being noticed, because we have very liberal laws as far as obtaining weapons,” explains Sutter. “Because of that, we have many cases in which persons intent on murdering other people have no trouble putting together a big arsenal.”

The Hudson scholar says it’s unlikely the Boston bombings will have any effect on the ongoing national debate regarding gun control legislation.

If in fact the two suspects hail from the predominantly Moslem Chechnya and Kyrgyzstan regions of Central Asia, should Moslems in this country fear profiling and suspicion of their community? Sutter doesn’t think so.

“I think Americans understand that these criminals don’t represent the Moslem American population,” he says. “I believe this will not lead to persecution against the law-abiding Moslems who live in this country and who are loyal to this country.”
Officials say the two bombing suspects are brothers and have resided in the United States for several years.