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Hundreds of DC High School Students March Against Trump


Washington D.C.-area high school students protesting President-elect Donald Trump marched from the Trump International Hotel to the U.S. Supreme Court, Nov. 15, 2016. (E. Sarai/VOA)

Washington D.C.-area high school students protesting President-elect Donald Trump marched from the Trump International Hotel to the U.S. Supreme Court, Nov. 15, 2016. (E. Sarai/VOA)

Nearly one thousand high school students from Washington, D.C. and surrounding areas walked out of their schools and marched across the city Tuesday in protest of President-elect Donald Trump.

A human rights club at Woodrow Wilson High School in D.C. informed students through social media and emailed parents with their intent to organize a walkout and a march through the city on Tuesday, students told VOA.

WATCH: Wilson High School protesters

Though hundreds of these students could not vote, they wanted to make their opinions on the president elect and their concerns for their own futures, clear.

One student held a sign in front of the Supreme Court which read, "Please do not cut my education funding!" Other students wore shirts which read "Nasty Woman," a reference to a comment Donald Trump made on his former competitor Hillary Clinton.

At protests in front of the U.S. Supreme Court a Washington D.C. high school student holds a sign reading “Please do not cut my education funding!” (E. Sarai/VOA)

At protests in front of the U.S. Supreme Court a Washington D.C. high school student holds a sign reading “Please do not cut my education funding!” (E. Sarai/VOA)

"I think it's important that Donald Trump and everybody know that…the youth of D.C. are against Donald Trump," Lomi, a sophomore at Woodrow Wilson high school, told VOA. "We are just as important as people who can vote, and in four years, we'll be able to vote. And when we do, our voices will be heard."

But she made it clear that her classmates would not wait four years to be heard, expressing her intent to write to her congressmen about what the youth of DC need.

"There's not really anything we can do about him becoming president," her friend Ulu added. "But... he has the power to change things, and I think we need to express that we need change," she said.

Protests continued over the weekend throughout the United States, but the Sunday night demonstrations were smaller than those in the immediate aftermath of the Republican Trump's upset of Democrat Hillary Clinton last week.

Demonstrations ranged from hundreds to thousands of people in major cities such as New York, Portland, Philadelphia and San Francisco over the past week.

East Los Angeles high school students protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump downtown Los Angeles, Nov. 14, 2016.

East Los Angeles high school students protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump downtown Los Angeles, Nov. 14, 2016.

But now, activist groups are looking ahead to a march on day after inauguration day, with many people on Facebook indicating their intent to fly to Washington to take part.

One of the largest protests planned for January 21 is the Women's March on Washington, which has over 80,000 people on Facebook marked as "attending."

"We stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families - recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country," the organizers wrote on the event page.

In an interview that aired Sunday night, Trump said Americans have nothing to fear about his presidency.

He wrote Friday on Twitter that he loves that there are small groups who have a passion for the country and predicted, "We will all come together and be proud!"

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