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Beijing Protests US Sail-By in South China Sea

  • VOA News

FILE - The USS Curtis Wilbur, a 8,950-ton Aegis destroyer of the U.S. Navy, arrives at a naval base in Busan, South Korea, June 4, 2010.

FILE - The USS Curtis Wilbur, a 8,950-ton Aegis destroyer of the U.S. Navy, arrives at a naval base in Busan, South Korea, June 4, 2010.

A U.S. Navy warship sailed through South China Sea waters claimed by China Saturday in a "freedom of navigation" exercise, which China denounced as "grave misconduct."

A spokesman at the Pentagon, Jeff Davis, said the passage by the guided-missile destroyer USS Curtis Wilbur was intended to enforce the international right to sail through such crucial navigation lanes.

The warship passed within 12 nautical miles of Triton Island in the Paracel group, which is claimed by Taiwan and Vietnam as well as by China.

Spratly Islands, China Sea Territorial Claims

Spratly Islands, China Sea Territorial Claims

In Beijing, a Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman said the U.S. destroyed peace and stability in the South China Sea with its maritime exercise, the second by an American warship in the area since October.

The spokesman, Yang Yujun, expressed China's "resolute opposition" to the sail-by, and said Chinese armed forces will take "all necessary measures against any act of provocation by the United States."

'Freedom-of-navigation operation'

Pentagon spokesman Davis said the U.S. destroyer was conducting a routine "freedom-of-navigation operation in the South China Sea.”

The mission was intended "to challenge attempts by the three claimants — China, Taiwan and Vietnam — to restrict navigation rights and freedoms,” Davis said.

No prior notice of the U.S. vessel's transit was given to China or any other regional authorities, "which is consistent with our normal process and international law," the Pentagon spokesman said.

Three months ago, the Navy sent another guided-missile destroyer on a similar mission close to one of the artificial islands China has built on a partly submerged reef in the South China Sea. That exercise also was denounced by China.

FILE - This aerial photo taken through a glass window of a military plane shows China's alleged on-going reclamation of Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea, May 11, 2015.

FILE - This aerial photo taken through a glass window of a military plane shows China's alleged on-going reclamation of Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea, May 11, 2015.

The U.S. Congress called for further freedom-of-navigation voyages after the October cruise. Earlier this month, Senator John McCain, chairman of the influential Senate Armed Services Committee, contended President Barack Obama had opposed further sail-bys in the South China Sea.

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