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Clinton, Trump Swap Insults as Presidential Campaign Heats Up

  • Ken Schwartz

FILE - Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gets off her campaign bus as she arrives for a rally at K'NEX, a toy company in Hatfield, Pa., July 29, 2016.

FILE - Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gets off her campaign bus as she arrives for a rally at K'NEX, a toy company in Hatfield, Pa., July 29, 2016.

Sunday is a traditional day of rest -- but not if you are running for president of the United States.

Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton was in Columbus, Ohio, the last stop on a three-day tour of Ohio and Pennsylvania -- two industrial states political experts say are going to be key battlegrounds in the November election.

"Donald Trump poses a serious threat to our democracy," she told the crowd, urging people not to listen to what she called her Republican rival's rhetoric and demagoguery.

Clinton visited factories in the two states where she said hard-working Americans are "still making things," and said Trump should be ashamed of using factories in places such as Mexico, Slovenia, and Bangladesh to make products with the Trump name on the label.

Clinton admitted she is up against "powerful forces," but did not refrain from telling the audience that the wealthy and Wall Street will "finally pay their fair share of taxes" to pay for her plans to create new jobs.

Meanwhile, Trump is charging the Democrats with rigging the debate schedule in September and October so that two of the three debates are held at the same time as National Football League games.

FILE - Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum, in Denver, Friday, July 29, 2016.

FILE - Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum, in Denver, Friday, July 29, 2016.

Football has a fanatical following in the United States and could attract a bigger television audience than the debates.

Trump initially told ABC television's This Week broadcast that the NFL sent him a letter complaining about the schedule. But after the NFL denied sending a letter, a Trump aide said the candidate learned of the conflict from "a source close to the league."

The non-partisan Commission on Presidential Debates says it began working more than a year and a half ago to pick suitable dates to avoid other big events and religious holidays. It says it is impossible to avoid all sporting events.

Trump holds campaign rallies Monday in two of the cities Clinton just visited -- Columbus and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Clinton will be in Omaha, Nebraska and Boulder, Colorado

While Trump boasts that television ratings showed more viewers watched his nomination acceptance speech than Hillary Clinton's, Clinton got a seven point post-convention bump in the polls.

The Morning Consult organization reported Sunday that Clinton leads Trump in voter preference 43 to 40 percent. Trump enjoyed a similar bump after the Republican convention and he briefly led the polls.

The survey also shows a large number of voters -- 17 percent -- are still undecided.

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