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Ghana’s President to Take Questions from the Press Friday

  • Peter Clottey

A top official said Ghana’s President, John Atta-Mills, will meet members of the media Friday as part of a campaign pledge he made before he was elected two years ago.

Korku Anyidoho, communications director of the Office of the President, told VOA President Atta-Mills will address questions about the state of the nation, his governance style, as well as the ongoing crisis in neighboring Ivory Coast.

Ghana's President Professor John Evans Atta-Mills

Ghana's President Professor John Evans Atta-Mills

“The president has made it a part of his governance style and part of the change agenda that he promised that, on the 7th of January every year, for as long as he remains president of the Republic of Ghana, he will make himself available to a certain category of the media…for the critical minds of the Ghanaian media to fire him questions,” said Anyidoho.

Mr. Atta-Mills has come under increasing criticism from members of the opposition who accuse him of failing to take a more active role in helping resolve the ongoing crisis in Ivory Coast.

The opposition contends that instability in Ivory Coast will have negative consequences on Ghana’s economic stability, as well as that of the entire West African sub-region.

This will be the second time President Atta-Mills will take questions from a section of the media dubbed the “editor’s forum.”

The forum, which is expected to last for about three hours, would be held at the seat of the president at the Osu Castle in the capital, Accra.

The section of the media expected to be present include media owners, senior editors, newsroom editors, anchors of morning shows and selected program producers.

Anyidoho said Mr. Atta-Mills will continue with effort to achieve his pledge for a better Ghana, in his words, for all Ghanaians. But, opponents say, despite his enormous political capital, Mr. Atta-Mills has been too slow to implement policies of his pledge, a charge Anyidoho denies.

“He addressed it appropriately last year during his state of the nation address when he said that he is slow, but he is sure, and that the race is not an alligator race and that the race for governance is not for the swiftest, but rather for the sturdiest.”

Local media reported that President Atta-Mills would be expected to answer questions surrounding the recent oil production and the fuel price hikes, as well as a loan agreement signed with the Chinese government.