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The IceCube Laboratory

Sensors buried deep in the Antarctica ice have detected evidence of high energy particles from outside the solar system. The extraterrestrial discovery could usher in a new age of astronomy and greater understanding of the nature of the universe.
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The IceCube Laboratory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica is the world's largest neutrino detector.(Sven Lidstrom, IceCube/NSF)
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The IceCube Laboratory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica is the world's largest neutrino detector.(Sven Lidstrom, IceCube/NSF)

IceCube used icebreakers to deliver heavy equipment from Sweden to the coast of Antarctica. (Chadden Hunter)
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IceCube used icebreakers to deliver heavy equipment from Sweden to the coast of Antarctica. (Chadden Hunter)

Scientists began deploying neutrino detectors beneath 1,500 meters of ice starting in November of 1992. (Robert Morse/NSF)
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Scientists began deploying neutrino detectors beneath 1,500 meters of ice starting in November of 1992. (Robert Morse/NSF)

Once the detectors were deployed, cables were pulled to connect the sensors to IceCube Lab’s servers. (Freija Descamps/NSF)
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Once the detectors were deployed, cables were pulled to connect the sensors to IceCube Lab’s servers. (Freija Descamps/NSF)

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