Accessibility links

Unrest in Pretoria as Zuma Corruption Report Released

  • VOA News

Protestors call for the removal of President Jacob Zuma outside court in Pretoria, Nov. 2, 2016.

Protestors call for the removal of President Jacob Zuma outside court in Pretoria, Nov. 2, 2016.

Police in South Africa's capital fired rubber bullets Wednesday to disperse protesters who gathered near President Jacob Zuma's office, demanding that he resign.

Journalist Thuso Khumalo, reporting for VOA, says thousands of protesters from the left-wing Economic Freedom Fighters party smashed cars and building windows as they marched toward the Union Buildings, South Africa's seat of government.

The protests took place shortly before South Africa's anti-corruption watchdog released a report on alleged corruption in the Zuma administration.

A judge ordered the release of the report Wednesday after Zuma dropped a legal bid to keep it out of the public eye.

President Jacob Zuma (C) and deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa (R) attend the declaration announcement of the municipal elections in Pretoria, South Africa, Aug. 6, 2016. This is the worst-ever election showing for South Africa's ruling party.

President Jacob Zuma (C) and deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa (R) attend the declaration announcement of the municipal elections in Pretoria, South Africa, Aug. 6, 2016. This is the worst-ever election showing for South Africa's ruling party.

The report examines accusations that Zuma allowed the wealthy Gupta family to choose cabinet members to serve their business interests.

The author, former public protector Thuli Madonsela, calls for Zuma to appoint a commission of inquiry within 30 days to further study allegations of improper relationships and influence.

The report was originally due to be released last month before Zuma blocked it.

FILE - A Sept. 28, 2012, photo shows the private compound homestead of South African President Jacob Zuma in Nkandla, in the northern KwaZulu Natal province South Africa.

FILE - A Sept. 28, 2012, photo shows the private compound homestead of South African President Jacob Zuma in Nkandla, in the northern KwaZulu Natal province South Africa.

Zuma has faced corruption allegations before, and was fiercely criticized for using about $20 million in public funds for upgrades to his private rural home. He later apologized and agreed to repay a fraction of the money.

Journalist Thuso Khumalo contributed to this report from Pretoria.

Show comments

XS
SM
MD
LG