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Obama, Romney Head to Key States on Election Eve

  • Chris Simkins

President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney make their closing arguments to voters on the final day of campaigning in the U.S presidential election. Both campaigns are working to encourage loyal supporters and attract undecided voters - with less than 24 hours before millions of Americans cast their ballots.

It is a sprint to the finish for Obama and Romney in an exceedingly close U.S. presidential race. With just hours until polls open, the candidates are making 14 stops in eight key states needed to win the election.

Battleground states in the 2012 U.S. presidential election

Battleground states in the 2012 U.S. presidential election

Both men are spending their final hours in Ohio, an important state where President Obama took aim at Romney's plan to cut taxes for wealthy Americans.

"This is not just a choice between two candidates or two parties, it is a choice between two different visions of America," the president told supporters. "It is a choice between a return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy or the strong growing middle-class based policies that are getting us out of a crisis."

"Your state is the one we are counting on," Romney said during a campaign event. "This is the one we have to win."

Former Massachusetts governor Romney also visited Ohio to make his final case to voters, and he spoke to 20,000 supporters in Pennsylvania.

"If there is anyone who wonders if better jobs and better pay checks are a thing of the past, I have a clear and unequivocal message, 'With the right leadership, America is about to come roaring back," he promised.

Both presidential candidates are rallying supporters and trying to attract minorities and independent women voters. More than 29 million Americans in 34 states have already cast ballots in early voting, although none of the ballots will be counted until Tuesday.

As the election draws to a close emotions are running high.

"Let us Vote!" some people shouted.

In Florida, angry residents at several polling places waited five to six hours, after election officials temporarily suspended early voting.

President Obama was twice interrupted by hecklers in Ohio, as police led away the demonstrators.

Also looming over Tuesday's election are voters on the East Coast still reeling from the devastating storm Sandy that hit the area last week. It is unclear if the outcome of the close race will be affected if hundreds of thousands of people view voting as an afterthought, as they struggle with major damage to their homes, power outages and fuel shortages.


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