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Russia Observes National Day of Mourning

As Russia observes a national day of mourning, authorities continue to search for the terrorists responsible for killing at least 39 people in two suicide bombings Monday in Moscow's subway system.

The Russian flag flies at half-staff over the Kremlin, as the country mourns the victims of the worst terrorist attack in Moscow since 2004.

People paid tribute to those who lost their lives in the bombings at the Lubyanka and Park Kultury metro stations, by placing flowers and lighting candles at the stops. Special services were also held at Moscow's Church of Christ the Savior.

Kristina Delek attended the service. Her niece was killed in the attacks.

She says it is such a great shame, and she sympathizes with everyone who lost relatives and loved ones. She says may God prevent anyone else going through the same experience.

During an emergency crisis meeting at his country residence, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev says he does not want anyone to have to deal with this sort of tragedy again.

He says today is a day of mourning. He says it is a terrible tragedy and new laws will be developed to prevent terrorism. He says Russia needs to focus its attention on several aspects of improving legislation that will prevent future attacks.

A woman who lost her granddaughter in the bombings, Valentina Yegeazaryan, says she does not have much faith in the government's plan to prevent future violence.

She says she can not get her grandchild back. She says there have been so many terrorist attacks and what have the authorities done? She says some time passes and then the same thing happens again.

In an interview on state-run television, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said terrorists must be "dragged out of the sewer" and that it is a matter of pride for law enforcement authorities to drag them out into broad daylight. Mr. Putin said he is positive those responsible would be found.

On Monday, Russian security forces linked the blasts to suspected Islamist separatists from the country's volatile North Caucasus region, which has seen an increase in threats from Islamist insurgents. Many analysts the insurgents are in a civil war with the Kremlin-backed administrations of the region, which includes Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingushetia. Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov also said he could not rule out foreign involvement in the attacks.

Meanwhile, ordinary Russians say no matter what happens they have to move on. Nadezhda, who refused to give her last name, says despite her fears of another attack, she is going to continue living.

She says she is terrified of riding on the metro, train or even airplane. But she says she is going to have to conquer her fear and get on with her life.