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Security Measures Implemented Ahead of Super Bowl

  • Parke Brewer

In this photo taken with a fisheye lens, football fans pose for photos in front of the Super Bowl XLVI logo on Monument Circle in Indianapolis, February 1, 2012.

In this photo taken with a fisheye lens, football fans pose for photos in front of the Super Bowl XLVI logo on Monument Circle in Indianapolis, February 1, 2012.

Football fans across the United States are anxiously awaiting this Sunday’s Super Bowl championship game between the New York Giants and New England Patriots. For those attending the game in Indianapolis, Indiana, and participating in events in conjunction with the Super Bowl, major security efforts are being undertaken. It is important enough that U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano was in Indianapolis Wednesday to discuss the operations.

Certainly the good news is that Janet Napolitano said no specific or credible threats have been made against this year’s Super Bowl, to be played at Lucas Oil Stadium.

While the primary law enforcement responsibilities rest with the Indiana public safety authorities, Napolitano said the federal government provides a great deal of support and assistance for the biggest sporting event in the U.S.

“We’ve provided first observer and anti-terrorism and security awareness training to more than 8,000 stadium staff and volunteers,” she said.

Thirty-five federal or component agencies are involved in security for the Super Bowl and related events this week in and around Indianapolis.

But Napolitano said the public is a partner as well.

“We are continuing a partnership with the National Football League through the “If you see something, say something” public awareness campaign," she said. "The idea is very straight forward. We simply ask the American people to be vigilant, to report suspicious activity.”

Napolitano added that the public offers some of the best prevention of terrorism. The NFL also contributes to the security plan on the civilian side, hiring more than 3,000 private security and crowd management personnel.

Fans will be subjected to metal detector searches and pat downs, and will be limited to what they can bring in to the stadium. There is even a limit to the length of spectators’ camera lenses - 15 centimeters.

Only those with tickets will be allowed into a designated security perimeter around the stadium. On Super Bowl Sunday, temporary flight restrictions will be in place prohibiting private aircraft from operating in a large radius around the sports complex.
It is a comprehensive operation to provide a safe and secure environment for all.

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