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Thousands of EU Supporters in Britain 'March for Europe'

  • VOA News

People hold banners during a "March for Europe" demonstration against Britain's decision to leave the European Union, in central London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU Brexit referendum.

People hold banners during a "March for Europe" demonstration against Britain's decision to leave the European Union, in central London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU Brexit referendum.

Thousands of European Union supporters marched through central London Saturday, protesting the Brexit referendum result.

Many participants in the 3-kilometer “March for Europe,” which went from Hyde Park to Parliament Square, said they hoped Britain’s lawmakers would block any moves to leave the 28-nation bloc.

Some 52 percent of Britons in the June 23 referendum voted for the country to leave the EU.

Many people are calling for a second referendum, arguing that the "Leave" campaign lied to the people and made pledges and promises that were abandoned once their side won the referendum.

Charlie Gardiner, a teacher from the southeast of the country, voiced the sentiment.

"If we are the home of democracy, parliamentary democracy, well they've got to give us a general election, they can't just push this through saying 'the people have spoken,' because the people have been lied to," Gardiner said.

People hold banners during a "March for Europe" demonstration against Britain's decision to leave the European Union, in central London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU Brexit referendum.

People hold banners during a "March for Europe" demonstration against Britain's decision to leave the European Union, in central London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU Brexit referendum.

Many others were angry at the lack of political leadership following the referendum result. Prime Minister David Cameron resigned and his Conservative Party was plunged into infighting over who will be the next leader.

On the other side, the majority of Labour Party lawmakers have called on its leader, Jeremy Corbyn, to resign.

“We have not got any leaders here, there is no politicians here, there is nobody leading us," Gardiner said.

British lawmaker Andrea Leadsom emerged on Saturday as the top pro-Brexit candidate to succeed Cameron, supported by a former Conservative Party leader and several members of parliament.

Leadsom, a junior minister, has slightly more support from conservative lawmakers than Michael Gove, the justice secretary and leading "Leave" campaigner, according to British media.

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