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Trump, Clinton to Make Major Economic Speeches This Week in Detroit

  • VOA News

Both Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Both Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton.

The economy is expected to be the focus of the presidential campaign this week when both top candidates make major speeches in the same city on their plans for the country if they are elected.

Republican Donald Trump will speak Monday and Democrat Hillary Clinton will appear Friday in Detroit - the struggling midwest city that is headquarters of the U.S. automobile industry.

"I will be the greatest jobs president that god ever created," Trump has said.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Merrill Auditorium, Aug. 4, 2016, in Portland, Maine.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Merrill Auditorium, Aug. 4, 2016, in Portland, Maine.

His plans are expected to include large corporate tax cuts for business and industry and to renegotiate trade deals that he says give all the advantages to countries such as China and Mexico.

Former U.S. Speaker of the House of Representatives Newt Gingrich, whose support of Trump has been lukewarm, was asked on Fox News Sunday if Trump's plans are economically sound.

"Of course not...no candidate's numbers add up."

Clinton has said she will put forth the biggest jobs creation program since World War II, focusing on rebuilding crumbling infrastructure, such as repairing and building roads, bridges, and airports. She said she will pay for it by making sure the wealthy and corporate America pay their fair share of taxes.

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds up a Donald Trump-brand tie made in China during a stop at a local tie company in Denver, Colorado, Aug. 3, 2016.

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds up a Donald Trump-brand tie made in China during a stop at a local tie company in Denver, Colorado, Aug. 3, 2016.

Last week, Donald was strongly criticized for his public feud with the parents of a Muslim-American soldier killed in Iraq in 2004.

Many veterans also felt his lighthearted acceptance of a gift of sacred Purple Heart award, given to wounded and dead servicemen and women, was an insult.

He fell behind Clinton in the polls and said the November election will be rigged, a remark President Barack Obama called "ridiculous." Obama also called Trump "unfit" to be president.

Trump's campaign manager, Paul Manafort, told Fox News on Sunday that Trump wants to put these controversies behind him.

"He is very focused, He knows what he needs to do. I am confident that he's going to start doing it," Manafort said.

But Trump's sharp tongue surfaced again Sunday. He tweeted that the "media is going crazy. They totally distort so many things on purpose."

Hours earlier in New Hampshire, he said Hillary Clinton was mentally unbalanced and "totally unhinged." He disputed Clinton's comments that Trump has a bad temper, is easily insulted, and cannot be trusted with the country's nuclear arsenal.

Watch: Trump, Clinton Address Email Scandal

Trump has said after her handling of classified e-mails while secretary of state, Clinton is the one who cannot be trusted with national security

Also Sunday, Ohio Governor John Kasich, who unsuccessfully ran for the Republican nomination, said whoever wins the election must stand up to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Speaking to CNN, Kasich called Putin a "thug" who is trying to revive the long-dead Soviet Union.

Kasich said Putin has got to return Crimea to Ukraine and that the U.S. cannot show weakness to someone who has become very aggressive towards the West.

Trump has faced charges of being someone who admires Vladimir Putin and ignoring allegations of brutality against the his political opponents.

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