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Trump, Clinton Trade Barbs Over Dueling Controversies

  • Ken Schwartz

This photo combo of file images shows U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump, left, and Hillary Clinton.

This photo combo of file images shows U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump, left, and Hillary Clinton.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump attacked each other Wednesday over dueling controversies dogging both candidates: new Trump comments on gun control that even have shaken up some supporters, and the old Clinton email controversy that her backers wish would go away already.

A conservative group called Judicial Watch released a new batch of emails sent and received when Clinton was secretary of state. The messages were between Clinton aides at the State Department and the Clinton Foundation, a charity she started with her husband, former President Bill Clinton.

Conservatives allege the emails prove contributors to the foundation had special access to the State Department -- something the Clinton campaign has always denied.

Speaking to an audience of coal miners in the eastern state of Virginia, Trump called the latest Clinton emails "pay for play," meaning you could buy influence with the world's leading diplomat.

"It's really really bad" and illegal, Trump said, before ripping into the media, whom he accused of failing to report the facts.

WATCH: Trump on Clinton "pay for play"

Trump also accused President Barack Obama of founding Islamic State and said Clinton was the group's "co-founder."

While Trump spoke to the miners, Clinton was talking to supporters in Iowa. She excoriated Trump for comments Tuesday that critics say was a call to gun rights supporters to assassinate Clinton and Supreme Court judges who want more gun control.

Clinton said Trump's comments "crossed the line."

"Words matter, my friends. And if you are running to be president or you are president of the United States, words can have tremendous consequences."

WATCH: Clinton says Trump comments cross the line

She tweeted that she is "humbled and moved" by the Republicans who are willing to stand up and say that Donald Trump does not represent their values.

The U.S. Secret Service, which is in charge of protecting the president and major candidates, says it is aware of Trump's comments. It is unclear what action it has taken, if any.

Trump denies any intent of violence behind his remarks. He said he clearly meant that those who want to protect the constitutional right to own a gun must unite and vote against Clinton.

As miners waved signs reading "Trump Digs Coal,", Trump promised to revive the waning U.S. coal industry and put miners back to work. He said mines are an important energy source that has been destroyed by government regulations against pollution from burning coal.

Clinton in Iowa highlighted what she said is the importance of clean renewable energy. She said such technology as solar and wind will create thousands of jobs and turn the U.S. into a 21st century "clean energy superpower."