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Trump Praises Ford, Fiat Chrysler for US Investments

  • Ken Bredemeier

Tim Kuniskis, Head of Passenger Car Brands - Dodge, SRT, Chrysler and Fiat, FCA - N. America, poses with the award for the Chrysler Pacifica as 2017 Utility Vehicle of the Year during the N. American International Auto Show in Detroit, Jan. 9, 2017.

Tim Kuniskis, Head of Passenger Car Brands - Dodge, SRT, Chrysler and Fiat, FCA - N. America, poses with the award for the Chrysler Pacifica as 2017 Utility Vehicle of the Year during the N. American International Auto Show in Detroit, Jan. 9, 2017.

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump is praising Fiat-Chrysler after the automaker announced plans to spend $1 billion on new manufacturing operations in the U.S. industrial heartland.

Fiat-Chrysler, the third biggest U.S. carmaker, said Sunday it would expand its plants in Ohio and Michigan, to produce new sports utility and pickup truck models, while adding 2,000 jobs.

The announcement came days after the No. 2 U.S. automaker, Ford Motor, said it was scrapping its expansion plans in Mexico and instead would spend $700 million to expand its U.S. operations and add 700 jobs.

Workers leave the Ford construction site after they were sent home early the day after the U.S. auto company cancelled plans to build its plant in Villa de Reyes, Mexico, Jan. 4, 2017..

Workers leave the Ford construction site after they were sent home early the day after the U.S. auto company cancelled plans to build its plant in Villa de Reyes, Mexico, Jan. 4, 2017..



"It's finally happening," Trump said in a Twitter message Monday after the Fiat-Chrysler announcement. "Thank you Ford and Fiat C!"

Trump had in recent days attacked General Motors, the biggest U.S. auto manufacturer, and Toyota, the world's largest, after they announced they were adding to their operations in Mexico. The president-elect threatened to impose a hefty border tax if GM and Toyota try to send the new vehicles back to U.S. car dealers to sell.

Trump assumes power when he is inaugurated January 20.

During his lengthy presidential campaign, the Republican vowed to impose a 35 percent tax on products made overseas by American companies and then sent back to the U.S. for sale. But he would need congressional approval for any new tariffs, with many of Trump's fellow Republicans favoring free trade, which he says costs U.S. workers their jobs as American manufacturers look for cheaper labor in other countries.

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