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UN Security Council Condemns Nigerian Bombings

  • Larry Freund

The United Nations Security Council has condemned the independence-day bombings in Abuja, Nigeria, on Friday that killed 12 people.

The 15-member Security Council condemned in what it calls "the strongest terms" Friday's bombings in Nigeria, calling them a heinous crime. The president of the Security Council, Uganda's ambassador Ruhakana Rugunda, read the council's statement: "The members of the Security Council reaffirmed that terrorism in all its forms and manifestations is criminal and unjustifiable regardless of its motivation, wherever, whenever and by whomsoever committed, and further reaffirmed the need to combat by all means in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts," he said.

The Security Council statement reminds countries that their anti-terrorism measures should comply with all their obligations under international law. "The members of the Security Council underlined the need to bring perpetrators, organizers, financers and sponsors of these reprehensible acts of terrorism to justice," Rugunda said.

The Security Council president said the council had not discussed the identity of the terrorists who exploded the bombs in Abuja, but said that Nigeria, with the support of the international community, is actively investigating the bombing attack.

Nigerian authorities have announced the arrest of nine people in connection with the bombings. A spokeswoman for Nigeria's intelligence services says the people arrested are linked to a former Nigerian militant leader, Henry Okah, who was arrested in South Africa Saturday and has been charged under anti-terrorist laws. His lawyers say he is innocent.

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