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White House: US Has Had Access to bin Laden Widows


White House spokesman Jay Carney says the United States has had access to Osama bin Laden's widows in Pakistan.

Carney made the statement Friday, but did not give further details.

The United States has wanted to question the women to get more information about the al-Qaida leader, following his death in a U.S. raid more than a week ago.

Pakistan took over the compound after the raid and detained three of bin Laden's widows.

Media reports have quoted U.S. officials as saying bin Laden's handwritten journal shows him urging his followers to focus on targeting the United States in a large-scale attack. They said the notebook describes plots against the U.S. rail system.

Bin Laden is believed to have personally written the journal, which U.S. Navy SEALs seized from his compound in the Pakistani city of Abbottabad.

Carney said al-Qaida is weakened but not dead following bin Laden's death, and that the Obama administration is "very vigilant" about the possibility of revenge attacks.

ABC News reported Friday that former U.S. President George W. Bush praised his successor, President Barack Obama, when Mr. Obama told him over the phone that bin Laden had been killed.

ABC News said Mr. Bush told a conference of hedge fund managers this week that President Obama described to him in detail the secret mission to raid bin Laden's compound and the decision he made to put the plan in action. Mr. Bush said he told Mr. Obama, "Good call."

U.S. intelligence officials are still in the process of sifting through the contents of dozens of flash drives, computers, and paper documents seized during the raid.

Officials say so far they have seen no evidence of specific, imminent plots against the U.S. or other Western targets.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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