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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

January 2014

January 25, 2014

High Levels of Molecular Chlorine in Atmosphere Above Arctic Noted

Scientists, led by Greg Huey a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology, recently studied the atmosphere above Barrow, Alaska, which is located within the Arctic Circle, and have discovered extraordinary levels of molecular chlorine in the air.  Scientists are concerned that high levels of the highly reactive chemical will have a very strong influence on the atmospheric chemistry above the Arctic. We also look at... A new report says global temperatures in 2013 were tied as the fourth warmest on record. Meanwhile, the European Union's executive arm has unveiled what it calls an ambitious new climate change and energy policy. A new study reveals that the smog that frequently chokes China comes partially from factories that supply the rest of the world with various goods.  Some of that pollution also winds up being exported to other countries. Someday, implanted medical devices such as a heart pacemaker may be powered by the movement of the body's organs. Officials from China's space agency joined their peers from 30 other countries in a recent meeting held here in Washington, DC.  Some think China’s presence at the meeting may signal their possible cooperation with international space exploration efforts. Although most US births take place in a hospital, a new home birth movement has sprung up in some places -- including New York City.


January 18, 2014

ESA's Comet Chasing Rosetta Mission

Today we talk with Mark McCaughrean, the European Space Agency's Senior Scientific Advisor for space science missions about Rosetta, a spacecraft that has been sent to the far reaches of our solar system to closely study the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or 67P/CG.  To save energy the Rosetta was put into hibernation for the last 31 months. The spacecraft will be roused from its slumber on Monday January 20th. Other stories we cover in today’s program… A new study released this past week is suggesting that caffeine can be used to boost our long-term memory. China has conducted an experimental flight of a hypersonic missile delivery vehicle designed to travel several times faster than the speed of sound. Retailers are looking at new technology to help them lure more customers. It’s summer in Australia, and according to a new report heatwaves there are becoming more common and severe.   Last month, China successfully landed an unmanned probe on the Moon.  The mission renewed a debate about the potential exploitation of the Moon's resources and who exactly owns the Earth's only natural satellite A California company has developed a new "smart spoon" that that they hope will help those living with Parkinson's Disease feed themselves.


January 04, 2014

Lab on a Chip + Cell Phone Could Lead to New Tool to Help Diagnose/Develop Treatment for Diseases

We talk with the leader of a research team from the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) that has demonstrated what could potentially be a new and less-expensive method for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as HIV and Hepatitis-C. Also… All 52 passengers aboard a Russian research ship stuck in ice for over a week in Antarctica were airlifted to safety Thursday. But, the crew of the Chinese icebreaker that provided the helicopter used in the airlift, said they are worried about their ship's ability to move through the thick sea ice after remaining stationary for several days. Researchers have developed the first non-invasive method of detecting malaria infection using a laser beam scanner.   U.S. spending on biomedical research has declined, and now represents less than one-half of such spending worldwide.   Scientists in Britain are now experimenting with embedding data in the plastic itself. Guys are you looking for a way to attract a female? According to a new study one way to do so is to sing! But make sure you warble on-key. A new study suggests that modern flowering plants, trees and agricultural crops may not have the characteristics, or the time, to respond to rapid human-induced climate change. Some children in the sun-drenched state of California are getting hands-on exposure to the frozen flakes, despite the warm weather, thanks to a museum.

January 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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