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Join host Rick Pantaleo to examine global issues in science, technology, health, agriculture, and the environment on Science World.

March 2014

March 29, 2014

New Noninvasive Screening Test for Colorectal Cancer Developed

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world and a group of scientists in Indiana have come up with a new more accurate noninvasive screening tool that could help medical professionals better screen their patients for the disease.  We’ll talk with one of the lead researchers behind the development of the new screening method on our One on One Segment And… A team of excited Astronomers in South America announced a first of its kind discovery this past week.  They said that they found the first asteroid or minor planet that was surrounded by two rings, similar to the ring systems found around Saturn and three other gas giant Jovian planets. It seems that the tensions between Russia and Ukraine are starting to impact the ongoing cleanup at Chernobyl, the site of one of the world's worst nuclear disasters. Scientists announced this week that they have built a customized copy of an entire yeast chromosome, which could lead to a better understanding of how the genes contained within in these packages of genetic material work together.


March 22, 2014

Scientists: Built-In Natural Climate Regulator Helps Keep Earth Habitable

A group of scientists from California and China released a new study this past week that explains why Earth has remained habitable despite natural events that have robbed other planets in our solar system of their ability to host and sustain life.  We’ll hear from the lead author of this study. And… As honey bees continue to mysteriously disappear one US government biologist is doing his part in trying to photograph as many bee species as possible before some become extinct.   We’ll hear how an obesity specialist is coming to the aid of an eight month old boy from Colombia who weighs over 20 kilograms, which is three times heavier than an average child of that age.   There’s big health news this past week for those living in developing countries.  Scientists have developed a revolutionary nanovaccine that does not require refrigeration or booster shots.   We have these stories and more coming your way on VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


March 15, 2014

What is Relativity - Einstein's Ideas and Why They Matter

This past Friday March 14th was Albert Einstein’s 135th Birthday.  The classic equation E=MC squared is part of Albert Einstein's "special theory" of relativity that was published in 1905.  Ten years later, in 1915, he published his "general theory" of relativity. Have you ever wondered what these two scientific theories are all about and why after 100 years the science community still considers them to be so incredibly important.   A scientist who just wrote a book on Einstein and his theories of relativity joins us today on our One on One Segment to explain. Also… The World Wide Web - the Internet - one of the most valuable and important information resources celebrated its 25th anniversary this past Wednesday (3/12/14). As we celebrate the World Wide Web’s silver anniversary, a new report says that Facebook may soon be a step closer to bringing Internet access to the entire world.   This past week, a group of young scientists came to Washington to compete for the top prize of $100,000 in the Intel Science Talent search. We’ll have these stories and much more on this edition of VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


March 08, 2014

Researchers Find Poor Sleep Quality Helps Cancers Grow Faster and More Agressively

This past week scientists in the U.S. brought attention to a pair of promising treatments that could lead to a cure for AIDS.   Some lucky students in California recently got a rare opportunity to talk with astronauts in space through a video link. . Researchers in California are working with Mickey Hart who was the drummer for the classic rock band The Grateful Dead to see if exposure to rhythm could help people with neurological diseases lead a better life. And… New research from scientists in Chicago has found evidence that poor sleep quality or having frequent bouts of interrupted sleep can actually speed up and worsen the growth of cancer and diminish our immune system’s ability to control or destroy cancers that are just beginning to develop.  Today we talk with the researcher who led the study on our One on One segment. We cover these stories and more on today’s edition of VOA's science, health and technology magazine, "Science World."


March 01, 2014

Scientist Develops Revolutionary New System to Name and Classify all of Earth's Life-Forms

Today we’ll talk Dr. Boris Vinatzer from Virginia Tech who has developed what some call a revolutionary biological naming and classification system.  It’s one that could help scientists better communicate with each other about life on Earth. We’ll learn more about this new system and the benefits it could provide. Also... NASA announced this past week that its Kepler space telescope discovered a record 715 new exoplanets orbiting some 305 stars. For over the last year and a half as many as 25 children in California have been stricken with a mysterious polio-like virus that has caused paralysis in five of the youngsters.   These stories and more on this week’s Science World.

March 2014

Science World is VOA’s on-air and online blog covering science, health, technology and the environment.

Rick PantaleoHosted by Rick Pantaleo, Science World‘s informative, entertaining and easy-to-understand presentation offers the latest news, features and one-on-one interviews with researchers, scientists, innovators and other newsmakers.


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Science World begins after the newscast on Friday at 2200, Saturday at 0300, 1100 and 1900 and Sunday at 0100, 0400, 0900, 1100 and 1200. The program may also be heard on some VOA affiliates after the news on Saturday at 0900 and 1100. (All times UTC).
 

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Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthroughi
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May 22, 2015 10:23 AM
Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
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Video Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthrough

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