Print options

October 31, 2012

New York City Tries Getting Back to Business

by VOA News

Parts of the storm-ravaged U.S. East Coast are trying to get back to business Wednesday.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was at the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street to ring the opening bell.  It is the first time traders have returned to work since Hurricane Sandy walloped the region, flooding parts of the city's famed subway system.

Two of New York's three airports are beginning limited services, though the third - LaGuardia Airport - remains closed because of flood damage.

Airports, rail service, and local public transit in other cities along the Eastern Seaboard are also resuming services.

But there are other signs that many areas still have a long way to go.

In New Jersey, floodwaters and floating debris hindered firefighters Wednesday as they tried to battle a series of natural gas fires in the coastal town of Mantoloking, where several homes burned to the ground two days ago.

​​
Later Wednesday, U.S. President Barack Obama is set to visit the storm-battered state, where many are calling Sandy one of the worst natural disasters ever to hit the region.

Obama and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie are expected to view the damage together and thank emergency workers for their efforts. On Tuesday, Christie, a Republican normally at odds with the Democratic president, praised the Obama administration for what he said has been an "outstanding" response to the destructive storm.

The president has declared "major disasters" in New York and New Jersey, freeing federal funds aimed at offsetting billions of dollars in East Coast property damage.

In many areas, rescue and utility workers are hard at work, doing their best to clean up in the aftermath of the storm.

The storm's impact has even caught the attention of the Vatican, where on Wednesday Pope Benedict spoke about the disaster during prayers.

"Conscious of the devastation caused by the hurricane which recently struck the East Coast of the United States of America, I offer my prayers for the victims and I express my solidarity with all those engaged in the work of rebuilding,'' he said.

Sandy has killed at least 45 people in North America.  The storm hit the New Jersey shore late Monday, causing massive flooding, raging fires and power outages that crippled the New York metropolitan area.
 
As the storm moves west, it has triggered unseasonably powerful blizzards in the mountains.  Forecasters say it is now making its way toward Canada's southern border.

Sandy killed at least 65 people in the Caribbean last week before moving toward the United States.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.