News / Middle East

Egyptian Security Forces Arrest Brotherhood Leader's Son

Egyptian men try to help save the life of an al-Azhar University student heavily injured from clashes outside the university in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013.Egyptian men try to help save the life of an al-Azhar University student heavily injured from clashes outside the university in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013.
x
Egyptian men try to help save the life of an al-Azhar University student heavily injured from clashes outside the university in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013.
Egyptian men try to help save the life of an al-Azhar University student heavily injured from clashes outside the university in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013.
Reuters
Egyptian security forces have arrested the son of a Muslim Brotherhood leader on charges of inciting violence, the Interior Ministry said on Tuesday, the latest move in a crackdown against the group now branded a terrorist organization.

Anas Beltagi was arrested with two others in an apartment in Nasr City, the same district where security forces in August broke up protests calling for the reinstatement of President Mohamed Morsi, a Muslim Brotherhood leader who was ousted by the army in July.

They were found in possession of a shotgun and ammunition, the Interior Ministry said in a statement.

Beltagi's father, Mohamed Beltagi, is in jail facing trial for inciting violence along with other Muslim Brotherhood leaders.

Security forces launched a crackdown against the  Brotherhood in August, arresting many of their leaders including Morsi and putting them on trial for inciting terrorism and violence. Hundreds have been killed.

Since Morsi's overthrow, security forces have been struggling with some of the worst violence Egypt has seen in decades but the Muslim Brotherhood has denied any links to violence or terrorism.

On Tuesday, a court sentenced six Brotherhood members to three years in jail and a fine of 50,000 Egyptian pounds ($7,200) each for engaging in violent actions, protesting and rioting. Some 139 members were sentenced on Monday to two years in jail and a fine of 5,000 Egyptian pounds over similar charges.

Security forces also arrested on Tuesday the former presidency spokesman, Yasser Ali, who served under Morsi, state media reported. He was found in an apartment in Cairo. A security source said he was arrested over accusations of inciting violence and protesting and joining a terrorist group.

Egypt last month issued a protest law that makes it illegal to hold demonstrations without the approval of the police.

Egypt in safe army hands

The military-installed government last week formally listed the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization and accused it of carrying out a suicide bomb attack on a police compound in the Nile Delta that killed 16 people. The Brotherhood has denied involvement.

”The Egyptian people are entrusted in our hands and we are capable of carrying out such responsibility,” army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sissi said in an address to troops on Tuesday.

”We are ready to sacrifice with our blood for the sake of Egypt and the Egyptians,” added the powerful army general, who is likely to run for the presidency in an election expected to take place in a few months.

The United States had on Monday expressed concern about the government's designation of the Brotherhood as a terrorist group, as well as the ongoing detentions and arrests by security forces.

”We remain deeply concerned about all of the politically motivated arrests, detentions, and charges in Egypt. These actions raise questions about the rule of law being applied impartially and equitably, and do not move Egypt's transition forward,” State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said in Washington.

Although Sissi reiterated in his speech that Egypt is for all its people, security forces continue to crack down on the Brotherhood, the state's oldest and most organized group and which won all five elections since the downfall of autocratic president Hosni Mubarak in 2011.

Some 16 pro-Brotherhood students are due to stand trial on Saturday for protesting without permission, according to judicial sources. The authorities also froze the funds of 572 leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood, including Pakinam el-Sharkawi, Morsi's political adviser.

Continuing clashes

Clashes between protesters and security forces also continued for a second day on Tuesday at Al Azhar University, a main stage of violent protests since the start of its fall semester in September and in which nine have been killed.

Judicial sources said 34 pro-Brotherhood protesters from Azhar University were sent to jail for 15 days pending investigations over causing chaos at the university and resisting authorities as well as damaging public property.

Egypt is pushing through with a roadmap to political transition that could see new parliamentary and presidential elections next year. A referendum on a new constitution is due to take place in mid-January.

Minister of Social Solidarity Ahmed al-Borei said in remarks carried by state media on Tuesday that the “door is open” for members of the Muslim Brotherhood who have not been involved in violence to run in the presidential and parliamentary elections as individual candidates.

He also said the presidency is planning to carry out the presidential contest before parliamentary elections next year, changing a roadmap to democracy that the army outlined in July.

Interim President Adly Mansour is due soon to issue a statement setting the schedule and timeframe of both elections, the presidency said in a statement.

You May Like

Sydney Hostage-taker Failed to Manipulate Social Media

Gunman forced captives to use personal Facebook, YouTube accounts to issue his demands; online community helped flag messages, urged others not to share them More

UN Seeks $8.4 Billion to Help War-Hit Syrians

Effort aimed at helping Syrians displaced within their own country and those who've fled to neighboring ones More

Who Are the Pakistani Taliban?

It's an umbrella group of militant organizations whose objective is enforcement of Sharia in Pakistan 'whether through peace or war' More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Shimoru from: Japan
January 01, 2014 2:03 PM
what is the difference between Egyptians, Philistinians, Syrians, Jordanians, Iraqis... does anyone can tell me what is the difference between these people..??

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Will Pakistan School Shooting Galvanize Pakistan Against Extremism?i
X
Ayesha Tanzeem
December 17, 2014 11:54 AM
The attack on a military school in Pakistan’s northwest city of Peshawar left 141 dead, including 132 children. Strong statements of condemnation poured in from across the world. The country announced three days of mourning, and the leadership, both political and military, promised retribution. VOA's Ayesha Tanzeem looks at how likely the Pakistani government is to clamp down on all extremist groups.
Video

Video Will Pakistan School Shooting Galvanize Pakistan Against Extremism?

The attack on a military school in Pakistan’s northwest city of Peshawar left 141 dead, including 132 children. Strong statements of condemnation poured in from across the world. The country announced three days of mourning, and the leadership, both political and military, promised retribution. VOA's Ayesha Tanzeem looks at how likely the Pakistani government is to clamp down on all extremist groups.
Video

Video ‘Anti-Islamization’ Marches Increase Tensions In Germany

Anti-immigrant rallies in Germany have been building in recent weeks, peaking Monday night in the city of Dresden where tens of thousands of people turned out to demonstrate against what they call the ‘Islamization’ of the West. Germany has offered asylum to more Syrian refugees than any other country, and this appears to have set off the protests. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.
Video

Video Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countries

Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.
Video

Video Turkey's Authoritarianism Dismays Western Allies

The Turkish government has been defiant in the face of criticism at home and abroad for its raids targeting opposition media. The European Union on Monday expressed dismay after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan lashed out at Brussels for criticizing his government's action. Turkey's bid to be considered for EU membership has been on hold while critics accuse the NATO ally of increasingly authoritarian rule. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video US-China Year in Review: Hong Kong to Climate Change

The United States is pushing for a code of conduct to resolve territorial disputes in the South China Sea as it works to improve commercial ties with Beijing. VOA State Department correspondent Scott Stearns reports on a year of U.S. policy toward China from Hong Kong to climate change.
Video

Video Japanese Leader’s Election Win Raises Potential for Conflict with Neighbors

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his allies easily won a two-thirds majority in parliament Sunday, even though the country has slipped into recession under his conservative policies. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from Seoul, that the prime minister’s victory will empower him to continue economic reforms but also pursue a nationalist agenda that will likely increase tensions with Japan’s neighbors.
Video

Video Nuba Mountain Families Hide in Caves to Escape Aerial Bombings

Despite ongoing peace talks between Sudan's government and the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, or SPLM-N, daily aerial attacks continue in South Kordofan province’s Nuba Mountains. Adam Bailes was there and reports for VOA that government forces are targeting civilian areas, rather than military positions, with their daily bombardments.

All About America

AppleAndroid