News / Asia

Abdullah Threatens to Withdraw From Afghan Political Process

Afghan election workers count ballot papers for an audit of the presidential run-off, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 27, 2014.
Afghan election workers count ballot papers for an audit of the presidential run-off, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 27, 2014.
Ayaz Gul

After boycotting a United Nations-supervised audit of all votes from June's disputed runoff, Afghan presidential hopeful Abdullah Abdullah has now threatened to pull out from the entire political process if his demands are not met in 24 hours.

Controversies surrounding Afghanistan’s presidential election are undermining hopes for a smooth political transition in the war-ravage nation.

The Afghan Independent Election Commission [IEC] and U.N. officials say that weeks of auditing ballot boxes from the presidential runoff is near completion.

Validation process

Last week when they began the long-awaited process of validating or invalidating suspicious boxes, Abdullah pulled his observers, saying his demands for tightening the criteria were not met.

At the request of U.N. officials, rival presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani also withdrew his observers to ensure the integrity of the internationally-monitored vote scrutiny and its outcome.

Watch related video report by VOA's Meredith Buel

Chaotic Afghan Vote Recount Threatens Nation’s Futurei
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Meredith Buel
August 29, 2014 10:24 PM
Afghanistan’s troubled presidential election continues to be rocked by turmoil as an audit of the ballots drags on. The U.N. says the recount will not be completed before September 10. Observers say repeated disputes and delays are threatening the orderly transfer of power and could have dangerous consequences. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports.


Political negotiations between Ghani’s and Abdullah’s teams continued for devising a framework needed to establish a so-called “national unity government” after the audit results are announced.

But on Monday a spokesman for former foreign minister Abdullah said those talks have collapsed, blaming the other side for the failure.

Spokesman Muslim Sadaat said that despite public pledges, the Ghani campaign has gone back on its commitment to form a national unity government.

“They kept wasting the time and people are very tired and exhausted of the process," Saadat said.

"Therefore, we have set a deadline for tomorrow, which means in 24 hours if they did not come and agreed with our requests and demands both on the political and technical sides, we will withdraw from the process and any result coming out of this illegal, illegitimate process will not be acceptable for our team,” he said.

News conference

Sadaat said Abdullah will hold a news conference on Tuesday to explain “how and what went wrong with both the political and technical process.”

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry brokered the deal in early August between Ghani and Abdullah to prevent a political crisis and form a national unity government.

Washington intervened because Abdullah, who topped the first round of presidential voting in April, rejected the June runoff preliminary results that put Ghani well ahead of him, alleging massive fraud.

His supporters threatened to form a parallel government in Kabul.

Observers such as Lisa Curtis at the Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center admitted that a lot of suspicions do surround the outcome of the runoff vote.

“We have to see some compromise with the situation and living up to the agreement that Secretary Kerry brokered between the two leaders, which was essentially that whatever the results were from the recount there would be a unity government in which the loser will basically serve as a chief executive," Curtis said.

"Both leaders need to see that if one of them tries to cheat the other one out of some kind of power in this unity government then both seem to lose,” she added.

The Ghani team has made few public comments about details of their political negotiations, though the presidential candidate has maintained he is ready to make compromises that do not undermine the Afghan constitution.

Karzai involvement

The U.S.-mediated deal is in tatters and deepened the uncertainty about when President Hamid Karzai can hand over power to a successor.

Karzai had earlier planned Tuesday as the inauguration day for the new president, in time for him to attend a NATO summit in Wales two days later. But that was pushed back after the United Nations said it would be able to complete the audit only by around Sept. 10.

Karzai is not going to quit power without the completion of the process, a spokesman said.

“The President is not considering the step down before the official transfer of power to the new Afghan President. It is unconstitutional to step down before officially transferring the power to his successor,” Aimal Faizi said in a statement.

Audit deadline

The United Nations hopes the audit of more than 8 million votes will be completed by September 10, paving the way for war-torn Afghanistan’s first democratic transfer of power.

A peaceful political transition is seen critical ahead of the planned withdrawal of the bulk of U.S.-led international forces by end of this year.

The prolonged political transition comes at a time of deep anxiety in Afghanistan as the United States, Kabul's biggest aid donor, and other NATO nations withdraw their troops after nearly 13 years of fighting Taliban insurgents.

Officials and diplomats fear a breakdown between the presidential candidates and the power-brokers who have a stake in the process could trigger conflict along ethnic lines, on top of the deadly insurgency.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters.

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This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Hamidi from: Kabul Afghanistan
September 02, 2014 1:27 AM
Shame on you Dual Abdullah, every time when you know that you will lose you Boycott the process and you escaping, from the truth,


by: MUSTAFA from: INDIA
September 01, 2014 10:57 PM
Mr.Abdullah wants chair by force, this is sad story. Politicians Must think National interest first and then any thing else. He is power hungry man, every now and then he issued statement to boycott, which is foolish thing. He has to wait till the end and then accept public opinion with open heart. Do not create problems for poor Afghani. Afghans needs a Govt who care for public and not his personal bank account.


by: mrr a from: new york
September 01, 2014 2:05 PM
Who care? there will no change in Afghanistan.

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