News / Middle East

Activists Say Syrian Death Toll Tops 100,000

A Sep. 20, 2012 photo shows a wounded woman still in shock leaves Dar El Shifa hospital in Aleppo, Syria.
A Sep. 20, 2012 photo shows a wounded woman still in shock leaves Dar El Shifa hospital in Aleppo, Syria.
VOA News
Syrian activists say more than 100,000 people have been killed since the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad began in March 2011.

The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights announced its latest count Wednesday, saying the figure included 18,000 rebels and about 40,000 pro-Assad fighters.

The United Nations said earlier this month nearly 93,000 people were confirmed dead, but that the actual number is probably much higher.

  • Members of the Free Syrian Army aim their weapons as they take up a defensive position in Aleppo's Salaheddine district, Syria, June 25, 2013.
  • A female member of the Ahbab Al-Mustafa Battalion holds a gun as she undergoes military training in Aleppo's Salaheddine district, Syria, June 24, 2013.
  • This citizen journalism image provided by Aleppo Media Center AMC shows a rebel firing his weapon during heavy clashes with soldiers in Aleppo, Syria, June 24, 2013.
  • Syrian refugees wait for treatment at an Italian military hospital at the Al Zaatri refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the Syrian border, June 25, 2013.
  • A group of Syrian refugees wait for a bus at the Al-Zaatri refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the Syrian border, June 25, 2013.

Meanwhile, Jordan's King Abdullah warned the fighting in Syria could develop into a regional sectarian conflict.  In an interview for the pan-Arab Asharq al-Awsat newspaper, the king said a political solution remains the best way to resolve the crisis.

Also Wednesday, Kuwait's foreign minister addressed concerns about private Kuwaitis financing Sunni extremists in the Syrian conflict.

At a joint news conference with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Sabah Khalid Hamad al-Sabah said fund raising for Syria is tightly restricted to ensure support goes to the "right side" in the conflict.

On Tuesday, Kerry met with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal, who said the world should not allow Iran and the militant group Hezbollah to prop up Mr. Assad's government.

The prince called for an international ban on supplying the Syrian government with weapons, criticizing Russian support for the Assad regime.

Saudi Arabia has been supplying weapons to rebel fighters, while the United States recently said it would send arms in addition to the non-lethal aid it had been providing.

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Comments
     
by: Mohamed from: Lebanon
June 26, 2013 4:31 PM
West power can't help because both side have terrorist element with them.

by: Hash from: Maryland
June 26, 2013 10:29 AM
At the beginning of the Syrian war, I could not wait for the US Govt to rush and help the rebels forces. I am pro Arab spring, because I feel it is time for these corrupt and dictatorship regimes must be replace by the new young Arab generation. But in Syria many Arab corrupt regimes like, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan, and many more like to put their agenda into practice in Syria.

These very same rebels I was hoping for the US to assist, later it came out on the news were killing the Syrian troops merciless. The rebels were beheading the Syrian troops, execute them in the public, killing them and taking out their hearts. That's the same style and manners AQ would conduct. The rebels kill like AQ, it is because they are AQ. Didn’t these AQ fighters kill the US diplomats in Benghazi, the very same diplomats who helped came to power? I hope the US and EU stay away from helping these rebels.

by: Amin from: Texas
June 26, 2013 10:03 AM
Looks like 100,000 means nothing, with both sides getting more arms to go ahead and kill some more. Why the US will not force the opposition to come to the table is beyond me. If they (opposition) will only negotiate if the win everything, what is there to negotiate? I think we are falling for the Saudi/Qatar trap of using us to achieve their goals.

by: Haron from: Afghanistan
June 26, 2013 9:22 AM
we salute to Syria troops that they're the powerful armies in the region. we're praying for Syria troops to kill all their enemies and never allow the savages of West to criticize their power of weaponry. otherwise one day the enemy will enter suicide attack on presidential palace as yesterday CIA entered the armor car with full of explosion with three suicide attackers with their copy identity card in Kabul city/Afghanistan. people of Syria must not be deceived of west promise to build a new democratic life in Syria.

by: Bearman from: U.S.A.
June 26, 2013 7:49 AM
We should not get involved. These are the people that we want to supply arms to? Check this out on the internet.

A shocking video of a Syrian rebel commander apparently cutting out organs from a dead government soldier and biting his heart illustrates the brutal nature of the country’s ongoing civil war.

Human Rights Watch reports that the video appears to show Khalid al-Hamad, aka Abbu Sakkar, cutting out the heart and liver of a dead Syrian government soldier before biting a chunk from the heart while insulting members of the ruling Alawite sect. Nice!

by: Anonymous
June 26, 2013 7:36 AM
"The prince called for an international ban on supplying the Syrian government with weapons, criticizing Russian support for the Assad regime."

This is a good statement, and should be followed. Anyone supporting Assad with weapons are accomplices in his murder campaign against the Syrian Nation. He has killed tens of thousands of unarmed innocent civilians.

by: kevin lee from: asbury park.nj
June 26, 2013 7:26 AM
Hey Obama, You could draw a really big "line in the sand" with the blood of 100,000.

by: Gary Montgomery
June 26, 2013 6:53 AM
we killed far more innocents than that in iraq for no good reason.

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