News / Asia

Activists Skeptical of China's Announced Labor Camp Reforms

Falun Gong practitioners watch a video about a solar eclipse, part of deprogramming efforts enforced at the Masanjia Reeducation-through-labor camp in northeast China's Liaoning province. (file photo)
Falun Gong practitioners watch a video about a solar eclipse, part of deprogramming efforts enforced at the Masanjia Reeducation-through-labor camp in northeast China's Liaoning province. (file photo)
TEXT SIZE - +
Purnell Murdock
For two years, from 2001 to 2003, Huang Bo spent long, arduous hours in forced manual labor in China.  His nimble fingers, steady and precise from years of work as a surgeon in Shanghai, weaved strings of Christmas lights, stuffed toy animals, wrapped Christmas gifts and performed any other menial task demanded as part of his "re-education" in a Chinese labor camp.  His crime:  being a follower of the Falun Gong meditation movement banned as a cult in the late 1990's.

The conditions were uncomfortable, at best.  "The first two or three months I was forced to do those kinds of things everyday because they want you to know the rules," said Huang.  "But actually it was just an excuse.  They just wanted to torture me to make me give up Falungong.  If you give up [your beliefs] sometimes you can have rice and enough sleep.  But if you don't give up, you can do these kinds of things every day for months."

Punishment, Huang said, was often severe.  "There was a guy who tried to write down [pass along] information in a packing box.  He was caught and had been given electrical shock until he could not urine or stool.  The police let all the people know about this.  They think it is a lesson that would stop anyone trying to do the same thing," he said.

He was not alone.  Chinese authorities have used the re-education centers to detain prostitutes, drug addicts and other petty criminals, sometimes for as long as four years, without putting them on trial in the country's overloaded court system.  Opponents of the system say Beijing also has used them to silence government critics and dissidents.

System goes back to 1950s

China this week said it was committed to reforming the re-education through labor system that was established in the 1950s, a time, according to the official Xinhua news agency, when the Communist Party of China was consolidating the newly founded republic and rectifying social order.

Xinhua says the system was modified to include more regulations from the end of the 1970s to the early 1980s, but many experts believe it contradicts higher-level laws, including the Constitution.  To accommodate social and economic changes that have taken place in China, the constitution was amended to emphasize the protection of human rights and citizens' private property, says Xinhua.

China's official media say more than 300,000 detainees were kept in hundreds of re-education centers. 

In a brief report Monday, television network CCTV's microblog quoted Meng Jianzhu, head of the Communist Party Politics and Law Committee, as saying China will stop using the "re-education through labor" system this year, after the nation's parliament approves the decision.  But details, such as what would become of existing camps and their current inmates, remain unclear.

Skepticism

"China has been talking about reforming the system for many years.  So talk of reform is not new," said Maya Wang, a Hong Kong-based analyst for the international rights group, Human Rights Watch.  "What we are afraid of is that the Chinese government is replacing the "re-education through labor" system with another administrative detention system."

"There has been discussion of pilot reform projects that were carried out starting last year.  They're being named illegal behavior correction projects.  We don't know anything about them," said Roseann Rife, East Asia Director for Amnesty International in Hong Kong.  She said it is not clear if such a revised system will provide a fair hearing or a chance for people to defend themselves.

If Beijing implements its plans, analysts say it would be a key step in reforming China's judicial system and its human rights image.  Some say ending labor camp sentences could be an indication of new Chinese leader Xi Jinping's desire to carry out moderate political and legal reforms that had largely stalled under predecessor Hu Jintao.  Since his rise to the leadership of the Communist party in November, Xi has called for further crackdowns on corruption and government extravagance and strengthening of the legal system.

"It very well could be," said Rife. "The danger is that it is simply an attempt to appear to be addressing these issues, appear to be implementing rule of law and human rights protections.  But it all comes down to implementation and are things really going to change for people on the ground?"

'Endemic' torture

Amnesty International says China's labor camps subject people to "endemic" torture and ill-treatment and should be abolished.  It says detainees who suffered abuse also should be provided with a "genuine chance for redress."

In a report Monday, the official Xinhua news agency acknowledged growing public criticism of the labor camps.  It cited two recent cases in which authorities apparently abused the system to lock up a village official who criticized the government and a  woman who demanded tougher penalties for the men convicted of raping her 11-year-old daughter.

Although such acknowledgements are welcome, the suffering from years in labor camp detention still lingers for Huang Bo.  "Even though I already left the labor camp for a long time, that electrical shock sound still makes me feel fear.  I am lucky.  I finally ran out of China and came to America," he said.


Victor Beattie and Ken Schwartz contributed to this report.  Additional reporting by Michael Lipin in Washington.

You May Like

Abuja Blast Impacts Lives, Livelihoods

Officials say they are looking at ways to help bombing victims and boosting security More

Cambodia Technology Adviser Criticizes Cybercrime Draft Law

Phu Leewood says current criminal code can be used to prosecute offenders and that there is no need for a separate law More

Photogallery A Year Later, Boston Remembers Deadly Marathon Bombings

City pauses to honor victims and salute emergency workers who came to their assistance in frantic moments after blasts More

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Google Buys Drone Companyi
|| 0:00:00
...
 
🔇
X
George Putic
April 15, 2014
In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Ray Bonneville Sings the Blues and More on New CD

Singer/songwriter Ray Bonneville has released a new CD called “Easy Gone” with music that reflects his musical and personal journey from French-speaking Canada to his current home in Austin,Texas. The eclectic artist’s fan base extends from Texas to various parts of North America and Europe. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Austin.
Video

Video Millions Labor in Pakistan's Informal Economy

The World Bank says that in Pakistan, roughly 70 percent work in the so-called informal sector, a part of the economy that is unregulated and untaxed. VOA's Sharon Behn reports from Islamabad on how the informal sector impact's the Pakistani economy.
Video

Video Passover Celebrates Liberation from Bondage

Jewish people around the world are celebrating Passover, a commemoration of their liberation from slavery in Egypt more than 3,300 years ago. According to scripture, God helped the Jews, led by Moses, escape bondage in Egypt and cross the Red Sea into the desert. Zlatica Hoke reports that the story of the Jewish Exodus resonates with other people trying to escape slave-like conditions.
Video

Video Police Pursue Hate Crime Charges Against Kansas Shooting Suspect

Prosecutors are sifting through the evidence in the wake of Sunday’s shootings in a suburb of Kansas City, Missouri that left three people dead. A suspect in the shootings taken into custody is a white supremacist. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, he was well-known to law enforcement agencies and human rights groups alike.
Video

Video In Eastern Ukraine, Pro-unity Activists Emerge from Shadows

Amid the pro-Russian uprisings in eastern Ukraine, there is a large body of activists who support Ukrainian unity and reject Russian intervention. Their activities have remained largely underground, but they are preparing to take on their pro-Moscow opponents, as Henry Ridgwell reports from the eastern city of Donetsk.
Video

Video Basket Maker’s Skills Have World Reach

A prestigious craft show in the U.S. capital offers one-of-a-kind creations by more than 120 artists working in a variety of media. As VOA’s Julie Taboh reports from Washington, one artist lucky enough to be selected says sharing her skills with women overseas is just as significant.
Video

Video UN Report Urges Speedier Action to Avoid Climate Disaster

A new United Nations report says the world must switch from fossil fuels to cleaner energy sources to control the effects of climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released the report (Sunday) following a meeting of scientists and government representatives in Berlin. The comprehensive review follows two recent IPCC reports that detail the certainty of climate change, its impacts and in this most recent report what to do about it. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble has the details.
AppleAndroid