News / Asia

Afghan Candidates Pledge Peace, Prosperity Amid Violence

Afghan Candidates Pledge Peace, Prosperity Amid Violencei
X
Sharon Behn
March 31, 2014 1:08 PM
In Kabul, giant, clean political posters overlook the city’s dusty, chaotic, traffic-filled streets. Here, open-air markets, small shopping malls, supermarkets and roadside stalls crowd each other, while men in turbans and women in blue burqas walk by blast walls topped with barbed wire. Sharon Behn has more.
Sharon Behn
In Kabul, giant, clean political posters overlook the city’s dusty, chaotic, traffic-filled streets. Here, open-air markets, small shopping malls, supermarkets and roadside stalls crowd each other, while men in turbans and women in blue burqas walk by blast walls topped with barbed wire.

Afghanistan is getting ready for presidential elections and all eight candidates are campaigning hard for the top slot. With current president Hamid Karzai constitutionally barred from a third term, the April 5 vote will be the first time power will be democratically transferred to a new leader.

Analyst Fred Kagan says it’s vital that the vote brings forth a new leader that is acceptable to the Afghan people. “Nothing less than the future of Afghanistan is at stake,” he says. “The prospect of having a peaceful transition from one elected Afghan leader to another elected Afghan leader not of the same family is enormous.”

Presidential hopefuls

Of nine presidential candidates, there are three front-runners. All are promising a future of stability and growth despite a weak economy and constant militant bomb attacks.

One is a former World Bank officer Ashraf Ghani. Seen as an intellectual, the carefully manicured Ghani is pledging to fight corruption and boost the economy. He is expected to continue the general political course set since the fall of the Taliban 13 years ago.

Another leading candidate is Zalmai Rassoul. A former foreign minister under current president Hamid Karzai, Rassoul, like Ghani, is a technocrat. Karzai’s brother Qayum left his own presidential bid to join Rassoul’s campaign. Critics say a vote for Rassoul is a  vote for Karzai.

And there is Abdullah Abdullah, an anti-Taliban figure and eye surgeon. Abdullah is also promising jobs and stability, but, as the former Afghan foreign minister who also ran for president in 2009, he is also vowing to reform the current presidential political system, distributing more power to the parliament.
 
  • Presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah, sitting atop a vehicle, arrives for an election campaign in Panjshir province, March 31, 2014.
  • Presidential candidate Abdul Rasoul Sayyaf gestures as he talks to supporters at an election campaign rally in Kandahar, March 31, 2014.
  • Afghan men pass an election poster showing presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadza in the center of Kandahar, March 31, 2014.
  • A woman walks past a wall with graffiti encouraging the public to vote in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, March 30, 2014.
  • Presidential candidate and former foreign minister Zalmai Rassoul (left) and his first vice-presidential candidate, Ahmad Zia Massoud (right) speak on a plane en route to Kabul, March 30, 2014.
  • A supporter of presidential candidate and former foreign minister Zalmai Rassoul, center, waves two Afghan national flags during a campaign rally in Herat, March 30, 2014.
  • The deeply conservative, all-male crowd at Afghanistan's Kandahar stadium watch as vice-presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi, in a headscarf stood up and reached for the microphone, Kabul, March 17, 2014.

Stability, security

Andrew Wilder, director of the South and Central Asia programs at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, calls the elections are crucial to the nation’s future.

“It’s so critically important, both for the future of political stability, security situation and the economic situation for these elections to go well," Wilder says. "So I think if they do go well, I think it will be transformative.”

The Taliban have vowed to forcibly disrupt the vote, and have already bombed and gunned down election workers, international observers, and police. On Saturday, Taliban militants attacked the headquarters of the Afghan Independent Election Commission, the latest in a series of attacks across the capital. The past month has been particularly deadly, with more than 100 civilians killed.

As for security, there are more green police pick-up trucks full of armed officers on the roads than usual. Missing are the fleets of armored vehicles that normally ferry international organization officers around the capital. US and international troops also now rarely make an appearance.

The Kabul Serena Hotel, attacked in mid-March by pistol-carrying teenage militants who left nine dead, is eerily quiet. International observers from the National Democratic Institute and Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe who had been staying there left the country after the attack.

Free and fair vote

Jandad Spinghar, head of the Free and Fair Election Foundation of Afghanistan (FEFA), is concerned about their departure. “The presence of international observers gives legitimacy, international legitimacy, to the election process," he says.

Not all the international observers have gone, and Spinghar says it’s important that considerable numbers are present on voting day, as their stamp of approval will go a long way toward persuading losing candidates and voters to accept the results.

FEFA has some 10,000 local observers deployed around the country to monitor the polls.

Election officials and security officers are equally determined to see the ballot take place successfully. General Salim Ehsas, head of the election security commission, says Afghan forces are deployed around the country.

“We have enough police, military, intelligence officers to safeguard the polling stations and roads for our people. We have the full support of our people," he says. "We are in contact with elders, religious leaders, and have asked for their advice and support.”

Meredith "Chip" Buel contributed to this report from Washington, D.C.

You May Like

Video One Year After Thai Coup, No End in Sight for Military Rule

Since carrying out the May 22, 2014 coup, the general has retired from the military but is still firmly in charge More

Video Afghan Economy Sinks As Troops Depart

Afghans are grappling with how exodus will affect country's fragile economy More

Video Scientists Say We Need Softer Robots

Today’s robots are mostly hard, rigid machines, with sharp edges and forceful movements, but researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say they should be softer and therefore safer More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: harvey from: las vegas, nv.
March 31, 2014 5:46 AM
It all comes back to Nation sovereigrity, whether air, land and sea.

Obviously, neither Nations or the United Nation's are not proactive to address, vote, and pass a global Law which all Nations sign, that over rides. and

Sets the standard globally, for all Nation's sovereigrity perimeters, which is the "core value" of those Nations that exist in this so called, "global community".

When Nation's Core value sovereigrity is invaded by its security perimeter, there will be reaction.

As Newton stated, "For every action, there is an opposite and equal reaction", which is the case here with North and South Korea.

Just like the other Nation of Ukraine, with it's port of Crimea being violated by its' state "core value perimeters" by the Russians, whether physical or invasion of air, land, or sea by military actions of practice or whatever means, the state-Nation should have legal priority, to balance, not compromise with those who chose to attempt to bully their way.

Just because of some advanced greater power, such as Nukes, or Nuke building capability, should not make their egos bigger then NATO, or other International Laws, which they sign, this is a legal, and enforceable contract, as our Global Community evolves.

There is no stopping globalization, it started from the Vikings, and continues even at this writing, whether we like it or not, if we can't run with the big dogs, then stay on our porch, and lick our pride.

No matter what our individual mindset is, just as we know longer live in the "Stone Age", we are not pagans, and we should follow the same guidelines of internal Constitutions to measure, and protect.

To secure our Nation, and our laws, not to build fences, but to tear down walls, in this developing Global Community.

Not wait until after the fact of massive slaughter like in Syria by Assad, or even the violation of Saddam in Iraq, or Afghanistan, or any Nation State, which we all know has cost our Nation State a lot of lives, and monies with none diplomatic actions to date.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthroughi
X
May 22, 2015 10:23 AM
Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthrough

Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Europe Follows US Lead in Tackling ‘Conflict Minerals’

Metals mined from conflict zones in places like the Democratic Republic of Congo are often sold by warlords to buy weapons. This week European lawmakers voted to force manufacturers to prove that their supply chains are not inadvertently fueling conflicts and human rights abuses. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Class Tackles Questions of Race, Discrimination

Unrest in some U.S. cities is more than just a trending news item at Ladue Middle School in St. Louis, Missouri. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, it’s a focus of a multicultural studies class engaging students in wide-ranging discussions about racial tensions and police aggression.
Video

Video Mind-Controlled Prosthetics Are Getting Closer

Scientists and engineers are making substantial advances towards the ultimate goal in prosthetics – creation of limbs that can be controlled by the wearer’s mind. Thanks to sophisticated sensors capable of picking up the brain’s signals, an amputee in Iceland is literally bringing us one step closer to that goal. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Afghan Economy Sinks As Foreign Troops Depart

As international troops prepare to leave Afghanistan, and many foreign aid groups follow, Afghans are grappling with how the exodus will affect the country's fragile economy. Ayesha Tanzeem reports from the Afghan capital, Kabul.
Video

Video Poverty, Ignorance Force Underage Girls Into Marriage

The recent marriage of a 17-year old Chechen girl to a local police chief who was 30 years older and already had a wife caused an outcry in Russia and beyond. The bride was reportedly forced to marry and her parents were intimidated into giving their consent. The union spotlighted yet again the plight of many underage girls in developing countries. Zlatica Hoke reports poverty, ignorance and fear are behind the practice, especially in Asia and Africa.
Video

Video South Korea Marks Gwangju Uprising Anniversary

South Korea this week marked the 35th anniversary of a protest that turned deadly. The Gwangju Uprising is credited with starting the country’s democratic revolution after it was violently quelled by South Korea’s former military rulers. But as Jason Strother reports, some observers worry that democracy has recently been eroded.
Video

Video California’s Water System Not Created To Handle Current Drought

The drought in California is moving into its fourth year. While the state's governor is mandating a reduction in urban water use, most of the water used in California is for agriculture. But both city dwellers and farmers are feeling the impact of the drought. Some experts say the state’s water system was not created to handle long periods of drought. Elizabeth Lee reports from Ventura County, an agricultural region just northwest of Los Angeles.
Video

Video How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction

An international team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of the woolly mammoth. Led by the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, the work opens the door to recreate the huge herbivore, which last roamed the Earth 4,000 years ago. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble considers the science of de-extinction and its place on the planet
Video

Video Blind Boy Defines His Life with Music

Cole Moran was born blind. He also has cognitive delays and other birth defects. He has to learn everything by ear. Nevertheless, the 12-year-old has had an insatiable love for music since he was born. VOA’s June Soh introduces us to the young phenomenal harmonica player.

VOA Blogs