News / Asia

Pakistan, Afghanistan Tensions Flare Cross-Border Attacks

Women protest NATO helicopter attacks on Pakistani troops, Islamabad, Dec. 1, 2011.
Women protest NATO helicopter attacks on Pakistani troops, Islamabad, Dec. 1, 2011.
Sharon Behn
ISLAMABAD — Tensions are rising between Pakistan and Afghanistan over deadly cross-border attacks on both sides of the porous border.

Each country accuses the other of harboring militant groups that easily cross the border and launch deadly attacks.

Kabul says the Pakistan military has been shelling areas inside Afghanistan, displacing and killing civilians. Islamabad says it is defending itself from militants who are crossing the border from Afghanistan and killing Pakistani soldiers and civilians.
 
According to Afghan Foreign Ministry spokesman Janan Mosazai, both governments are discussing the situation. But on Monday he warned that continued rocket attacks from Pakistan would threaten the already fragile relationship between the neighboring countries.

“We have said the continuation of any kind of rocket or artillery attacks on eastern Afghanistan, or any part of Afghanistan, could have a serious negative effect on relations between our countries," said Mosazai.

Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik has accused Afghanistan of harboring a top Pakistan Taliban leader known as Fazlullah. He said the Taliban leader had orchestrated a number of killings inside Pakistan.
 
Officials representing Afghan and international forces say Pakistan is not doing enough to eliminate Taliban and militant groups like the Haqqani network, which regularly lead assaults inside Afghanistan.
 
NATO spokesman Brigadier General Gunter Katz said Monday that talks were underway on a regional solution.

“Stability in this region rests on the strength of the partnership of ISAF (International Security Forces - Afghanistan), Afghanistan and Pakistan," he said.
 
But mistrust between Islamabad and Kabul runs deep.

Analysts in Islamabad have said it appears that neither country is willing nor able to control the militant fighters within their borders.
 
Rasul Bakhsh Rais, a political science professor at Lahore University, warns that all those involved in Afghanistan will lose if cross-border security issues are not settled before international forces leave.

“If they leave a relationship between Afghanistan [and Pakistan] that is hostile and unfriendly, and where both countries use militant groups as a lever, much of the good work that the international security forces have done will be lost," he said.
 
NATO’s senior civilian spokesman, Dominic Medley, said Monday the whole aim of the mission in Afghanistan was to leave a secure and stable country that would never again become a safe haven for terrorists.

You May Like

At Khmer Rouge Court, Long-Awaited Verdict Approaches

First phase of trial, which is coming to an end, has focused on forced exodus of Phnom Penh in 1975 - and now many are hopeful justice will be served More

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities More

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

Downing of Malaysian airliner, allegations of cross-border shelling move information war in war-torn country to a new level More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Jag Nathan from: USA
August 06, 2012 1:13 PM
Are we any surprised? Pakistan has ulterior motives, being directly related to their army’s concept of strategic depth. Simply put, the Pakistani army believes they can run and hide in the mountains of Afghanistan in the event of war with India. In fact, in a future war with India (which they expect to lose and hence the strategic depth concept), they will have no second thoughts about spilling Afghani blood to suit their agenda. Pakistan was never a friend of the Afghan people and can never be for they have from the day Pakistan was put together had aspirations on Afghan territory. Any surprise why there is very little love lost between Afghanis and Pakistanis.

In Response

by: question from: London
August 07, 2012 8:07 AM
@ Jag .. if that is what you think that pakistan has no love for afghanis .. then can you please come to pakistan and take your millions of afghan refugees back to afghanistan .. i think we have looked after millions of them since the soveits left givend millions of them pakistani citizenship and goverment documents so they can work... also can you please ask the afghanis to stop coming to peshawar and using are hospitals after all we are horrible people no need to come to our schools and universities, hospitals and go to the main cities and take our jobs.... we would be ever so grateful.... you are completely lonney if you think we startegic depth in afganistan lolol .. wow what a joke without pakistan afghanist will fail ... u need us more then we need .. lets not give you access to our sea ports u can just melt away .. or please just use iran for access i see how the tajeks and uzbeck will charge u a arm and a leg for access... its funny i bet you never have even lived in afganistan did you even know that the pakistani ruppe is your main currency its used even in kabul ... hahah a country which usues our currency talks like they can order us around .. instead of sending a rocket maybe we should send something a little bigger

In Response

by: Ahmed from: malaysia
August 06, 2012 10:11 PM
where do u get this crappy info... from the lame stream media??... oh sorry i mean the main stream media.... how abt u ask ur government to stop funding the syrian rebels, the terrorists in libya, Egypt and the list goes on....

In Response

by: a4hr from: pakistan
August 06, 2012 7:16 PM
its the same as USA they wanted oil therefore they invaded Afghanistan

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
July 31, 2014 8:13 PM
The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict in Gaza, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities. Probably the most important destination is the local bakery. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Gaza City.
Video

Video US-Funded Program Offers Honduran Children Alternative to Illegal Immigration

President Obama and Central American leaders recently agreed to come up with a plan to address poverty and crime in the region that is fueling the surge of young migrants trying to illegally enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden looks at one such program in Honduras - funded in part by the United States - which gives street kids not only food and safety but a chance for a better life without, crossing the border.
Video

Video 'Fab Lab' Igniting Revolution in Kenya

The University of Nairobi’s Science and Technology Park is banking on 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution in the country. Lenny Ruvaga has more for from Nairobi's so-called “FabLab” for VOA.
Video

Video Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelter

Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
Video

Video Rapid Spread of Ebola in West Africa Prompts Global Alert

Across West Africa, health officials are struggling to keep up with what the World Health Organization describes as the worst ebola outbreak on record. The virus has killed hundreds of people this year. U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders are watching the developments closely as they weigh what actions, if any, are needed to help contain the disease.
Video

Video Michelle Obama: Young Africans Need to Embrace Women's Rights

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama urged some of Africa's best and brightest to advocate for women's rights in their home countries. As VOA's Pam Dockins explains, Obama spoke to some 500 participants of the Young African Leaders Initiative, a six-week U.S.-based training and development program.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.
Video

Video Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California

Even though legal school segregation ended in the United States 60 years ago, one study finds segregation still occurs in the U.S. based on income and race. The University of California Los Angeles Civil Rights Project finds that students in California are more segregated by race than ever before, especially Latinos. Elizabeth Lee reports for VOA from Los Angeles.

AppleAndroid