News / Asia

Pakistan, Afghanistan Tensions Flare Cross-Border Attacks

Women protest NATO helicopter attacks on Pakistani troops, Islamabad, Dec. 1, 2011.
Women protest NATO helicopter attacks on Pakistani troops, Islamabad, Dec. 1, 2011.
TEXT SIZE - +
Sharon Behn
ISLAMABAD — Tensions are rising between Pakistan and Afghanistan over deadly cross-border attacks on both sides of the porous border.

Each country accuses the other of harboring militant groups that easily cross the border and launch deadly attacks.

Kabul says the Pakistan military has been shelling areas inside Afghanistan, displacing and killing civilians. Islamabad says it is defending itself from militants who are crossing the border from Afghanistan and killing Pakistani soldiers and civilians.
 
According to Afghan Foreign Ministry spokesman Janan Mosazai, both governments are discussing the situation. But on Monday he warned that continued rocket attacks from Pakistan would threaten the already fragile relationship between the neighboring countries.

“We have said the continuation of any kind of rocket or artillery attacks on eastern Afghanistan, or any part of Afghanistan, could have a serious negative effect on relations between our countries," said Mosazai.

Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik has accused Afghanistan of harboring a top Pakistan Taliban leader known as Fazlullah. He said the Taliban leader had orchestrated a number of killings inside Pakistan.
 
Officials representing Afghan and international forces say Pakistan is not doing enough to eliminate Taliban and militant groups like the Haqqani network, which regularly lead assaults inside Afghanistan.
 
NATO spokesman Brigadier General Gunter Katz said Monday that talks were underway on a regional solution.

“Stability in this region rests on the strength of the partnership of ISAF (International Security Forces - Afghanistan), Afghanistan and Pakistan," he said.
 
But mistrust between Islamabad and Kabul runs deep.

Analysts in Islamabad have said it appears that neither country is willing nor able to control the militant fighters within their borders.
 
Rasul Bakhsh Rais, a political science professor at Lahore University, warns that all those involved in Afghanistan will lose if cross-border security issues are not settled before international forces leave.

“If they leave a relationship between Afghanistan [and Pakistan] that is hostile and unfriendly, and where both countries use militant groups as a lever, much of the good work that the international security forces have done will be lost," he said.
 
NATO’s senior civilian spokesman, Dominic Medley, said Monday the whole aim of the mission in Afghanistan was to leave a secure and stable country that would never again become a safe haven for terrorists.

You May Like

Multimedia Parents of Disaster Ferry Passengers Lash Out at Authorities

Twenty-nine bodies recovered from water but some 270 remain trapped on board More

War Legacy Haunts Vietnam, US Relations

US congressional delegation initiates $84 million Agent Orange cleanup project More

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Jag Nathan from: USA
August 06, 2012 1:13 PM
Are we any surprised? Pakistan has ulterior motives, being directly related to their army’s concept of strategic depth. Simply put, the Pakistani army believes they can run and hide in the mountains of Afghanistan in the event of war with India. In fact, in a future war with India (which they expect to lose and hence the strategic depth concept), they will have no second thoughts about spilling Afghani blood to suit their agenda. Pakistan was never a friend of the Afghan people and can never be for they have from the day Pakistan was put together had aspirations on Afghan territory. Any surprise why there is very little love lost between Afghanis and Pakistanis.

In Response

by: question from: London
August 07, 2012 8:07 AM
@ Jag .. if that is what you think that pakistan has no love for afghanis .. then can you please come to pakistan and take your millions of afghan refugees back to afghanistan .. i think we have looked after millions of them since the soveits left givend millions of them pakistani citizenship and goverment documents so they can work... also can you please ask the afghanis to stop coming to peshawar and using are hospitals after all we are horrible people no need to come to our schools and universities, hospitals and go to the main cities and take our jobs.... we would be ever so grateful.... you are completely lonney if you think we startegic depth in afganistan lolol .. wow what a joke without pakistan afghanist will fail ... u need us more then we need .. lets not give you access to our sea ports u can just melt away .. or please just use iran for access i see how the tajeks and uzbeck will charge u a arm and a leg for access... its funny i bet you never have even lived in afganistan did you even know that the pakistani ruppe is your main currency its used even in kabul ... hahah a country which usues our currency talks like they can order us around .. instead of sending a rocket maybe we should send something a little bigger

In Response

by: Ahmed from: malaysia
August 06, 2012 10:11 PM
where do u get this crappy info... from the lame stream media??... oh sorry i mean the main stream media.... how abt u ask ur government to stop funding the syrian rebels, the terrorists in libya, Egypt and the list goes on....

In Response

by: a4hr from: pakistan
August 06, 2012 7:16 PM
its the same as USA they wanted oil therefore they invaded Afghanistan

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politicsi
X
Michael Eckels
April 19, 2014
There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politics

There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid