News / Africa

African Union Suspends Egypt

Marthe van der Wolf
The African Union announced Friday that Egypt’s membership has been suspended due to the military action in Cairo that deposed President Mohamed Morsi and suspended the nation's constitution.
 
The secretary of the African Union Peace and Security Council, Admore Kambudzi, says Egypt is barred from participating in any AU activity.
 
“The overthrow of the democratic elected president does not conform to the relevant provisions of the Egyptian constitution and is therefore false under the definition of an unconstitutional change of government. The council decides to suspend the participation of Egypt in AU activities until the restoration of constitutional order.” Kambudzi said.
 
The military toppled the Morsi government and declared the constitution suspended on Wednesday, saying the president had failed to meet demands of the Egyptian people. Egypt’s top judge was sworn in as the country'sw temporary leader on Thursday.
 
Egypt's ambassador to the African Union, Mohamed Edrees, defended the military's actions. He told the AU Peace and Security Council Friday there has not been a military coup.
 
“The military role in this is to support the people. The military did not instigate a coup or impose its own agenda against the will of the Egyptian people, on the contrary. The military supported the agenda of the people [and] the roadmap which was endorsed by the whole broad spectrum of the Egyptian society.” Edrees said.
 
The African Union says it is planning to send a high-level delegation to Egypt to consult with the ruling authorities and others.
 
The African Union currently has three other member states on suspended status, all as a result of what are considered ACTIONS CONTRARY TO THEIR NATIONAL CONSTITUTIONS: Madagascar, Central African Republic and Guinea-Bissau.

You May Like

Russia Names US NGO 'Undesirable'

Prosecutors determine activities of National Endowment for Democracy to be 'undesirable,' paving the way for it to be outlawed on Russian territory More

Erdogan Vows 'Anti-Terror' Campaign in Syria, Iraq

Erdogan expressed confidence the 'necessary steps' will be taken by NATO leaders, who will meet Tuesday at Turkey's request More

North Korea: 'No Interest at All' in Nuke Deal

Senior US envoy Sydney Seiler visits Beijing Tuesday for talks on how to revive the stalled six-party nuclear talks with North Korea More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: azza radwan sedky from: vancouver, BC
July 07, 2013 1:37 PM
I hate to tell you that you are siding with a dictator that was destroying Egypt.
See "A people's coup" http://azzasedky.typepad.com/egypt/2013/07/a-peoples-coup.html
If you want to side against a country in desperate need of a democracy, then go for it.

by: Raymond Babcock from: Topeka Ks. 66612
July 06, 2013 10:07 AM
they people in egypt did not vote for shria law or the muslim brother hood it is to bad that morisi tried to instill the muslim brotherhood i support the military in egypt

by: Comrade Democracy
July 06, 2013 12:08 AM
Recent past history of Africa leaves much to be desired when it comes to democracy. Coups, military dictatorships are all to prevalent and no amount of "wordsmithing" or hypocrisy will change the facts. Count up those African states where the miltary has been involved in "Democracy Coups" Idi Amin ring a bell? to mention just one

by: ali baba from: new york
July 05, 2013 5:09 PM
African union is a joke. if the military has not intervene, the country will be in civil war and many lives will be lost .the military action is appropriate
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
July 06, 2013 1:59 PM
first democracy does not exited with Islamic Gov. .since moresy is elected ,Egypt experience a nightmare , the military has to make necessary change to put the situation under control. otherwise ,the country will fall apart. African union has made a poor decision to suspend Egypt
In Response

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
July 05, 2013 8:04 PM
Dear Ali Baba, the Egypt's suspension from African Union is not a joke, what's unacceptable is the overthrow of the democratic elected president. I'm not a fan of Islamic Brotherhood. No one should expect that Mohammed Morsi to turn Egypt into paradise within a year. People elected Morsi into Office and he should be elected out of Office. Military take over is not good enough.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 05, 2013 11:44 AM
Point of correction: there was no coup in Egypt, even if some think otherwise. What happened was a recall of non-performing candidate by his constituency. In civilized and industrial countries of the world, the president would understand when he became unpopular and heed the call to resign. But in African and other third world countries, the only language they understand is force. Even if the only supporters they have is themselves only, no president in Africa will ever heed the call to step down when they become unpopular, when their policies can no longer fascinate the people, or when the people want change in order to try another hand in the constituency. Instead they become demigods and resort to witch hunting and other elimination series to silence the people. Now what happened in Egypt is that the people decided to correct the error made in their inconclusive revolution.

The army is a bona fide part of the Egyptian society and only helped in getting the incumbent obey the rule of law – even if an unwritten law of common sense that requires no constitutional documentation or a law court to be enforced.

The African Union members are themselves both culpable and vulnerable to these failures. Without proper consideration they want to alienate Egypt as a safeguard for themselves when they refuse to listen to the yearnings of their own people. They are protecting themselves against legitimate intervention in the affairs of a country whose incumbent leaders are blinded by corruption and fail to deliver on their mandate. The army is part and parcel of the societies so shortchanged by these leaders and to say they should not come to the rescue of the people when the political processes fail is a disservice to / disenfranchisement of the people.

In civilized countries the army understands this and does not meddle civilian affairs. The checks and balances, including the lively consciences of those entrusted with the affairs of their country make it superfluous to call in the army – for they do not wait for the murmuring to get out of hand before affected officers play the ball. In other words they are good players who know when to play on and when to quit – which is lacking in Egypt, the case study.
In Response

by: kuku from: Ginchi
July 06, 2013 10:15 AM
Nobody could win the game playing out of agreed rules. Thus, no matter strong is your justification for not respecting the rule, you would not be excused. I am not arguing that an incompetent leader should not be ousted, but it should be effected as directed by the constitution. Any act contradicting the constitution might lead to disagreement, confrontation, chaos, bloodshed bla bla..
In Response

by: Plain Mirror Intl from: Plain Planet-Africa
July 05, 2013 1:57 PM
Godwin my brother, accept my warm hand-shake from a distance. The truth is what you have briefly-detailed. Barack Obama told Morsi that there is more to democracy than just been elected. In other words, Morsi does not know the real meaning of democracy and a JUNK man like him had automatically lost legitimacy as a president. The Egypt millitary only defined democracy for him. Shame on Morsi and the so called brotherhood.

Africa Union should prepare to sanction more of its member states because it is obvious that more of millitary interventions are coming. Democracy is not a ticket to stupidity by the elected officials. For as much as African leaders continue to rubbish the definition of Democracy considering it only to the government by elected representatives and ignoring the other inclusive definition as government of the people, by the people and for the people, then our uniformed men must always be there to define it for them in this same manner whether they like it or not. Bloody civilians in suits and agbada trying to play with uniformed lions, is that not stupidity?

The will of the people is done in Egypt and that is democracy better defined by the army. Long live Egypt armed forces! long live the people of Egypt!!

by: Petros Sibanda
July 05, 2013 10:21 AM
I dont think Egypt is worried by the AU, when no action was ever taken against an African Government whose 5th Brigade Force, was responsible for the loss of some 20,000 people or Rwanda where a staggering number of people, lost their lives. Please Admore, be more consistent just for once.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US Calls Fight Against Human Trafficking a Must Wini
X
July 28, 2015 12:21 AM
The United States is promising not to give up its fight against what Secretary of State John Kerry calls the “scourge” of modern slavery. Officials released the country’s annual human trafficking report Monday – a report that’s being met with some criticism. VOA’s National Security correspondent Jeff Seldin has more from the State Department.
Video

Video US Calls Fight Against Human Trafficking a Must Win

The United States is promising not to give up its fight against what Secretary of State John Kerry calls the “scourge” of modern slavery. Officials released the country’s annual human trafficking report Monday – a report that’s being met with some criticism. VOA’s National Security correspondent Jeff Seldin has more from the State Department.
Video

Video Iran Nuclear Pact Wins Few New US Congressional Backers

Later this week, President Barack Obama returns from a trip to Africa to confront a U.S. Congress roiled by the nuclear accord with Iran, an agreement that has received the blessing of the U.N. Security Council. Days of intensive lobbying and testimony by top administration officials have won few new congressional supporters of the pact. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports.
Video

Video Washington DC Underground Streetcar Station to Become Arts Venue

Abandoned more than 50 years ago, the underground streetcar station in Washington D.C.’s historic DuPont Circle district is about to be reborn. The plan calls for turning the spacious underground platforms - once meant to be a transportation hub, - into a unique space for art exhibitions, presentations, concerts and even a film set. Roman Mamonov has more from beneath the streets of the U.S. capital. Joy Wagner narrates his report.
Video

Video Obama Encourages Kenya to Fix Cultures of Corruption, Discrimination

President Barack Obama bid farewell to Kenya Sunday with a major speech at as stadium outside the capital Nairobi where he called on Kenyans to change the cultures of corruption and discrimination that can hold society back. VOA East Africa Correspondent Gabe Joselow has the story.
Video

Video Europe’s Twin Crises Collide in Greece as Migrant Numbers Soar

Greece has replaced Italy as the main gateway for migrants into Europe, with more than 100,000 arrivals in the first six months of 2015. Many want to move further into Europe and escape Greece’s economic crisis, but they face widespread dangers on the journey overland through the Balkans. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
Video

Video Stink Intensifies as Lebanon’s Trash Crisis Continues

After the closure of a major rubbish dump a week ago, the streets of Beirut are filling up with trash. Having failed to draw up a plan B, politicians are struggling to deal with the problem. John Owens has more for VOA from Beirut.
Video

Video Paris Rolls Out Blueprint to Fight Climate Change

A U.N. climate conference in December aims to produce an ambitious agreement to fight heat-trapping greenhouse gases. But many local governments are not waiting, and have drafted their own climate action plans. That’s the case with Paris — which is getting special attention, since it’s hosting the climate summit. Lisa Bryant takes a look for VOA at the transformation of the French capital into an eco-city.
Video

Video Racially Diverse Spider-Man Takes Center Stage

Whether it’s in a comic book or on the big screen, fans have always known the man behind the Spider-Man mask as Peter Parker. But that is changing, at least in the comic book world. Marvel Comics announced that a character called Miles Morales will replace Peter Parker as Spider-Man in a new comic book series. He is half Latino, half African American, and he is quite popular among comic book fans. Correspondent Elizabeth Lee reports from Los Angeles.
Video

Video California Towns Welcome Special Olympics Athletes

Cities and towns in Southern California are greeting thousands of athletes who are arriving for Special Olympics, a competition for people with intellectual disabilities. The games will run from July 25th through August 2nd. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan reports from Pasadena, California, where athletes from Namibia, Singapore and Tanzania got a rousing welcome from local residents.
Video

Video Critics of Japan Defense Policy Focus on Okinawa

In Okinawa, many locals have long complained that Tokyo places an unfair burden on the tiny island by locating most of Japan's U.S. military bases there. As Japan's government moves toward strengthening and expanding the country's defense policies, opponents of those plans are joining local protesters in Okinawa, voicing concern about where the country is headed. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from Okinawa.
Video

Video IS Uses Chemical Weapons in Syrian Attack

Islamic State militants have added a new weapon in their arsenal of fear: chemical weapons. VOA Kurdish service reporter Zana Omer was on the scene within hours of a recent attack in Hasakah, Syria, and has details of the subsequent investigation, in this report narrated by Miguel Amaya.
Video

Video Historic Symbol Is Theme of Vibrant New Show

A new exhibit in Washington is paying tribute to the American flag with a wide and eclectic selection of artwork that uses the historic symbol as its central theme. VOA’s Julie Taboh was at the DC Chamber of Commerce for the show’s opening.
Video

Video Hoverbike Flying Toward Reality

Another long-standing dream of many technological inventors is quickly approaching reality: U.S.- and British-based firms are cooperating in the development of an individual flying platform they call a hoverbike. They say it may revolutionize the concept of flying, including in the U.S. military. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video As Japan Expands Defense Role, Protests Follow

The Japanese government is moving forward with a controversial security bill that would authorize the military to fight abroad for the first time since World War II. Leaders say it is critical to defend against rising threats from China and North Korea. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from Japan on the big changes ahead, and the opposition they are drawing.
Video

Video Replacing Poppies with Coffee in Myanmar

The remote mountains of Myanmar’s Shan state are home to the second-largest opium-producing region in the world. After a drop during the 2000s, production surged in the past eight years to feed an increasing demand for heroin in China. But farmers are now making less on the crop, and the U.N. is hoping many will make the switch to growing coffee. Daniel de Carteret reports for VOA from Taunggyi.

VOA Blogs