News / Africa

African Union Suspends Egypt

Marthe van der Wolf
The African Union announced Friday that Egypt’s membership has been suspended due to the military action in Cairo that deposed President Mohamed Morsi and suspended the nation's constitution.
The secretary of the African Union Peace and Security Council, Admore Kambudzi, says Egypt is barred from participating in any AU activity.
“The overthrow of the democratic elected president does not conform to the relevant provisions of the Egyptian constitution and is therefore false under the definition of an unconstitutional change of government. The council decides to suspend the participation of Egypt in AU activities until the restoration of constitutional order.” Kambudzi said.
The military toppled the Morsi government and declared the constitution suspended on Wednesday, saying the president had failed to meet demands of the Egyptian people. Egypt’s top judge was sworn in as the country'sw temporary leader on Thursday.
Egypt's ambassador to the African Union, Mohamed Edrees, defended the military's actions. He told the AU Peace and Security Council Friday there has not been a military coup.
“The military role in this is to support the people. The military did not instigate a coup or impose its own agenda against the will of the Egyptian people, on the contrary. The military supported the agenda of the people [and] the roadmap which was endorsed by the whole broad spectrum of the Egyptian society.” Edrees said.
The African Union says it is planning to send a high-level delegation to Egypt to consult with the ruling authorities and others.
The African Union currently has three other member states on suspended status, all as a result of what are considered ACTIONS CONTRARY TO THEIR NATIONAL CONSTITUTIONS: Madagascar, Central African Republic and Guinea-Bissau.

You May Like

Germany Celebrates 25 Years of Unity

October 3 is a public holiday, marking the day in 1990 when East Germany and West Germany reunited More

Analysts: Russia's Syria Strikes Shake Regional Powers

If Moscow bolsters Assad, Saudi Arabia, other Gulf countries may feel obliged to step in More

Video Innovative Nano-Tech Water Filter Prevents Disease

It can absorb contaminants like copper, bacteria, viruses and pesticides, says Askwar Hilonga, who has been successfully trying out his product in Arusha More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
by: azza radwan sedky from: vancouver, BC
July 07, 2013 1:37 PM
I hate to tell you that you are siding with a dictator that was destroying Egypt.
See "A people's coup"
If you want to side against a country in desperate need of a democracy, then go for it.

by: Raymond Babcock from: Topeka Ks. 66612
July 06, 2013 10:07 AM
they people in egypt did not vote for shria law or the muslim brother hood it is to bad that morisi tried to instill the muslim brotherhood i support the military in egypt

by: Comrade Democracy
July 06, 2013 12:08 AM
Recent past history of Africa leaves much to be desired when it comes to democracy. Coups, military dictatorships are all to prevalent and no amount of "wordsmithing" or hypocrisy will change the facts. Count up those African states where the miltary has been involved in "Democracy Coups" Idi Amin ring a bell? to mention just one

by: ali baba from: new york
July 05, 2013 5:09 PM
African union is a joke. if the military has not intervene, the country will be in civil war and many lives will be lost .the military action is appropriate
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
July 06, 2013 1:59 PM
first democracy does not exited with Islamic Gov. .since moresy is elected ,Egypt experience a nightmare , the military has to make necessary change to put the situation under control. otherwise ,the country will fall apart. African union has made a poor decision to suspend Egypt
In Response

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
July 05, 2013 8:04 PM
Dear Ali Baba, the Egypt's suspension from African Union is not a joke, what's unacceptable is the overthrow of the democratic elected president. I'm not a fan of Islamic Brotherhood. No one should expect that Mohammed Morsi to turn Egypt into paradise within a year. People elected Morsi into Office and he should be elected out of Office. Military take over is not good enough.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 05, 2013 11:44 AM
Point of correction: there was no coup in Egypt, even if some think otherwise. What happened was a recall of non-performing candidate by his constituency. In civilized and industrial countries of the world, the president would understand when he became unpopular and heed the call to resign. But in African and other third world countries, the only language they understand is force. Even if the only supporters they have is themselves only, no president in Africa will ever heed the call to step down when they become unpopular, when their policies can no longer fascinate the people, or when the people want change in order to try another hand in the constituency. Instead they become demigods and resort to witch hunting and other elimination series to silence the people. Now what happened in Egypt is that the people decided to correct the error made in their inconclusive revolution.

The army is a bona fide part of the Egyptian society and only helped in getting the incumbent obey the rule of law – even if an unwritten law of common sense that requires no constitutional documentation or a law court to be enforced.

The African Union members are themselves both culpable and vulnerable to these failures. Without proper consideration they want to alienate Egypt as a safeguard for themselves when they refuse to listen to the yearnings of their own people. They are protecting themselves against legitimate intervention in the affairs of a country whose incumbent leaders are blinded by corruption and fail to deliver on their mandate. The army is part and parcel of the societies so shortchanged by these leaders and to say they should not come to the rescue of the people when the political processes fail is a disservice to / disenfranchisement of the people.

In civilized countries the army understands this and does not meddle civilian affairs. The checks and balances, including the lively consciences of those entrusted with the affairs of their country make it superfluous to call in the army – for they do not wait for the murmuring to get out of hand before affected officers play the ball. In other words they are good players who know when to play on and when to quit – which is lacking in Egypt, the case study.
In Response

by: kuku from: Ginchi
July 06, 2013 10:15 AM
Nobody could win the game playing out of agreed rules. Thus, no matter strong is your justification for not respecting the rule, you would not be excused. I am not arguing that an incompetent leader should not be ousted, but it should be effected as directed by the constitution. Any act contradicting the constitution might lead to disagreement, confrontation, chaos, bloodshed bla bla..
In Response

by: Plain Mirror Intl from: Plain Planet-Africa
July 05, 2013 1:57 PM
Godwin my brother, accept my warm hand-shake from a distance. The truth is what you have briefly-detailed. Barack Obama told Morsi that there is more to democracy than just been elected. In other words, Morsi does not know the real meaning of democracy and a JUNK man like him had automatically lost legitimacy as a president. The Egypt millitary only defined democracy for him. Shame on Morsi and the so called brotherhood.

Africa Union should prepare to sanction more of its member states because it is obvious that more of millitary interventions are coming. Democracy is not a ticket to stupidity by the elected officials. For as much as African leaders continue to rubbish the definition of Democracy considering it only to the government by elected representatives and ignoring the other inclusive definition as government of the people, by the people and for the people, then our uniformed men must always be there to define it for them in this same manner whether they like it or not. Bloody civilians in suits and agbada trying to play with uniformed lions, is that not stupidity?

The will of the people is done in Egypt and that is democracy better defined by the army. Long live Egypt armed forces! long live the people of Egypt!!

by: Petros Sibanda
July 05, 2013 10:21 AM
I dont think Egypt is worried by the AU, when no action was ever taken against an African Government whose 5th Brigade Force, was responsible for the loss of some 20,000 people or Rwanda where a staggering number of people, lost their lives. Please Admore, be more consistent just for once.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Russia’s Syria Involvement Raising Concerns in Europei
Luis Ramirez
October 02, 2015 4:45 PM
European nations are joining the United States in demanding that Russia stop targeting opposition groups other than the Islamic State militants as Russian warplanes continue to conduct raids in Syria. The demand came in a statement from Britain, France, Germany, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United States Friday. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.

Video Russia’s Syria Involvement Raising Concerns in Europe

European nations are joining the United States in demanding that Russia stop targeting opposition groups other than the Islamic State militants as Russian warplanes continue to conduct raids in Syria. The demand came in a statement from Britain, France, Germany, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United States Friday. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.

Video First Self-Driving Truck Debuts on European Highways

The first automated semi-trailer truck started its maiden voyage Friday, Oct. 2, on a European highway. The Daimler truck called 'Actros' is the first potentially mass-produced truck whose driver will be required only to monitor the situation, similar to the role of an airline captain while the plane is in autopilot mode. VOA’s George Putic reports.

Video Nano-tech Filter Cleans Dirty Water

Access to clean water is a problem for hundreds of millions of people around the world. Now, a scientist and chemical engineer in Tanzania (in East Africa) is working to change that by creating an innovative water filter that makes dirty water safe. VOA’s Deborah Block has the story.

Video Demand Rising for Organic Produce in Cambodia

In Cambodia, where rice has long been the main cash crop, farmers are being encouraged to turn to vegetables to satisfy the growing demand for locally produced organic farm products. Daniel de Carteret has more from Phnom Penh.

Video Migrant Influx Costs Europe, But Economy Could Benefit

The influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants is testing Europe’s ability to respond – especially in the poorer Balkan states. But some analysts argue that Europe will benefit by welcoming the huge numbers of young people – many of them well educated and willing to work. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

Video Botanists Grow Furniture, with Pruning Shears

For something a bit out of the ordinary to furnish your home, why not consider wooden chairs, crafted by nature, with a little help from some British botanists with an eye for design. VOA’s Jessica Berman reports.

Video New Fabric Helps Fight Dust-Related Allergies

Many people around the world suffer from dust-related allergies, caused mainly by tiny mites that live in bed linen. Polish scientists report they have successfully tested a fabric that is impenetrable to the microscopic creatures. VOA’s George Putic has more.

Video Burkina Faso's Economy Deeply Affected by Political Turmoil

Political turmoil in Burkina Faso over the past year has taken a toll on the economy. The transitional government is reporting nearly $70 million in losses in the ten days that followed a short-lived coup by members of the presidential guard earlier this month. The crisis shut businesses and workers went on strike. With elections on the horizon, Emilie Iob reports on what a return to political stability can do for the country's economic recovery.

Video Fleeing Violence, Some Syrians Find Refuge in Irbil

As Syrians continue to flee their country’s unrest to seek new lives in safer places, VOA Persian Service reporter Shepol Abbassi visited Irbil, where a number Syrians have taken refuge. During the religious holidy of Eid al-Adha, the city largely shut down, as temperatures soared. Amy Katz narrates his report.

Video Nigeria’s Wecyclers Work for Reusable Future in Lagos

The streets and lagoons of Africa's largest city - Lagos, Nigeria - are often clogged with trash, almost none of which gets recycled. One company is trying to change that. Chris Stein reports for VOA from Lagos.

Video Sketch Artist Helps Catch Criminals, Gives a Face to Deceased

Police often face the problem of trying to find a crime suspect based on general descriptions that could fit hundreds of people in the vicinity of the crime. In these cases, an artist can use information from witnesses to sketch a likeness that police can show the public via newspapers and television. But, as VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Houston, such sketches can also help bring back faces of the dead.

Video Thailand Set to Build China-like Internet Firewall

Thai authorities are planning to tighten control over the Internet, creating a single international access point so they can better monitor content. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Bangkok on what is being called Thailand’s own "Great Firewall."

Video Croatian Town’s War History Evokes Empathy for Migrants

As thousands of Afghanistan, Iraqi and Syrian migrants pass through Croatia, locals are reminded of their own experiences with war and refugees in the 1990s. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from the town of Vukovar, where wartime scars still are visible today.

Video Long Drought Affecting California’s Sequoias

California is suffering under a historic four-year drought and scientists say even the state's famed sequoia trees are feeling the pain. The National Park Service has started detailed research to see how it can help the oldest living things on earth survive. VOA’s George Putic reports.

VOA Blogs