News / Africa

Africa's Female Presidents Say They Offer Different Kind of Leadership

Cindy Saine
WASHINGTON - Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Malawi's new President Joyce Banda and several other female present and former heads of state and government gathered in Washington Monday for a panel discussion on the challenges of international development, democracy and global security.  

The administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development, Rajiv Shah, opened the first Frontiers in Development forum at Georgetown University by announcing a unique first panel.

"We did not try this morning and set out to produce an opening panel with five female heads of state. That that happened coincidentally is a signal of the way the world is evolving and changing," said Shah.

Female leaders attending the forum:

  • Malawi's new President Joyce Banda gives a press conference on April 10, 2012 in Lilongwe. (AFP)
  • Labour Party leader Helen Clark and husband Peter Davis vote in the New Zealand general election, Auckland, November 08, 2008. (AP)
  • Liberia's President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf arrives for a meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in Nigeria's capital Abuja February 16, 2012. (Reuters)
  • Mary Robinson, former president of Ireland, participates in a pledge to work on environmental entrepreneurship  in New York on September 21, 2010. (Reuters)
  • Kosovo's President Atifete Jahjaga attends the 15th Forum 2000 Conference on "Democracy and the Rule of Law" in Prague on October 11, 2011. (Reuters)
In addition to Malawi's Joyce Banda and Liberia's Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the panel included the President of the Republic of Kosovo, Atifete Jahjaga, the former president of Ireland, Mary Robinson, and the former prime minister of New Zealand, Helen Clark. President Banda said she is certain that women look at leadership differently, and that they look at leadership as an opportunity to serve the people.

"And I believe that leadership is a love affair," said Banda. "You must fall in love with the people, and the people must fall in love with you."

President Banda said she came out of an abusive marriage and her long-standing goals are to work tirelessly to empower girls and women economically and to promote maternal health and safe childbirth. She has only been in office for six weeks and attracted a lot of attention for taking quick action to sell the presidential jet and to reduce the size of the presidential motorcade.

Former New Zealand President Helen Clark said this was a refreshing change from normal practice.

"Sometimes symbolic decisions, such as President Banda has just made, around selling the presidential plane and the fleet of Mercedes, when I tweeted about this, I got an incredibly positive reaction about 'there's a woman in charge,' said Clark."

Ms. Clark said women tend to make better leaders because they are more directly connected to the needs of their people and because they still more often play a direct role in caring for children and frail relatives.  

President Sirleaf of Liberia said having women in leadership positions does make a real difference. Ms. Sirleaf had this response when asked what she would like Western and international development assistance donors to recognize.

"That our people, particularly those is rural areas, are intelligent if not educated, that they know what their needs are, they know what best will help them to change their lives," said Sirleaf.

Several of the speakers pointed out that with tough economic times in the United States and Europe, there are likely to be cuts in the amount of development assistance.  U.S. Senator Richard Lugar strongly defended U.S. foreign aid programs.

"But I would assert this morning that development assistance, when properly administered, remains a bargain for United States national security and for our own economic and moral standing in the world," Lugar said.

Senator Lugar, a moderate Republican from Indiana, lost his Republican primary race in his home state last month to a more conservative Tea Party challenger, and will be leaving the Senate after 36 years.  He has been a leading champion of U.S. development aid.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Jasper from: Kampala Uganda
June 13, 2012 5:32 AM
Kudos for Banda but as for Ellen and what she has done to the nation..... I am hesitant. Appointing sons in key positions makes her look like a male dictator- if she doesn't change she should not use her gender to say anything!


by: Rob
June 12, 2012 7:00 AM
What ms. Banda has shown so far is not leadership. She is following the orders of her donors. Why else would she decriminalise homosexuality, when no one in her country is in favor of that? Why else would she refuse entry to the president of Sudan for an African Union conference, when she is the president of another African country? Ms. Sirlieaf, by the way, is one of the most corrupt "leaders" in Africa today. Woman or man, it makes no difference to me, if they don't show real leadership and honesty to the their people.

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