News / Asia

Air Pollution in Northern China Blamed for Drop in Life Span

Endless lines of slow-moving cars emerge like apparitions and disappear into the gloom of the thick smog that has shrouded Beijing for weeks and reduced its skyline to blurry gray shapes, January 31, 2013.
Endless lines of slow-moving cars emerge like apparitions and disappear into the gloom of the thick smog that has shrouded Beijing for weeks and reduced its skyline to blurry gray shapes, January 31, 2013.
VOA News
Researchers studying the health impact of China’s air pollution say that people in the south of the country are living on average 5.5 years longer than their counterparts in the north.

Using health and pollution data collected by official Chinese sources, scientists concluded that decades of burning coal have led to a rise in deaths from cardio-respiratory diseases for people living north of the Huai River - considered the dividing line between northern and southern China.

The academics from the United States, Israel and China concluded that government coal policies in force since China’s Mao era have resulted in higher levels of total suspended particulates north of the Huai River.

Coal winters

Incidence of disease in north and south China, 1999-2000Incidence of disease in north and south China, 1999-2000
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Incidence of disease in north and south China, 1999-2000
Incidence of disease in north and south China, 1999-2000
Li Hongbin, professor of Economics at Tsinghua’s School of Economic and Management and one of the authors of the study, says that winter heating is a major reason for high emissions in the cold north of China.

"The north of China relies on central heating based on burning coal that originates heavy air pollution. This is one the most important reasons why there’s such a big difference in pollution level between the north and the south” he says.

The study, published on the American journal The Proceeding of National Academy of Sciences, shows that excessive coal burning raises the level of soot, smoke and other airborne particles - the total suspended particulates - by 55 percent more in the northern bank of the Huai River.

Li Hongbin says that “basically, exposure to total suspended particulates level above 100 micrograms per cubic meter reduces life expectancy of about 3 years and increases mortality by 14 percent.” 

The Huai River divide

In the aftermath of the communist revolution, the Chinese government started a policy of allocating free coal for boilers that could generate heat during the north’s cold winters.
At the time the demarcation line was set along the Huai River, one of major waterways that runs across Henan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces in central China.

Today that border is still in place and the country is still burning coal to stay warm.

In addition to central heating, coal has also been used to feed a flourishing government-led heavy industry in northern provinces for decades.

  • Women wearing face masks run to cross a street in Beijing, May 6, 2013. The United States Embassy monitor on air quality in China classified the quality of air in Beijing as "hazardous."
  • A man rows a boat on a river during a hazy morning in Shaoxing, Zhejiang province, June 16, 2013. 
  • A man wearing a mask is seen on a street in Beijing, May 2, 2013. Street-level anger over air pollution that blanketed many northern cities this winter spilled over into online appeals for Beijing to clean water supplies.
  • A statue of China's late Chairman Mao Zedong is seen in front of buildings during a hazy day in Shenyang, Liaoning province, May 7, 2013. 
  • Beijing schools kept children indoors, January 14, 2013, and hospitals saw a spike in respiratory cases following a weekend of excessive pollution in China's smoggy capital.
  • A teacher leads her students doing body exercises during class break in a classroom on a foggy day in Jinan, Shandong province, January 14, 2013.
  • Cranes atop a residential building under construction in central Beijing, April 18, 2012.
  • Smoke billows from a chimney of a heating plant in Beijing, February 13, 2012.
  • Haze blankets the National Stadium, also known as the Bird's Nest, as seen from inside the Olympic Green area during the Olympics, August 7, 2008.
  • A coal-burning power station at night in Xiangfan, Hubei province, September 15, 2009.
  • Paramilitary policemen practice drills inside the Forbidden City amid haze in central Beijing, December 4, 2011.
  • Buildings in Beijing are pictured on an evening with heavy haze and smog, October 28, 2011.

Impact on health

This week’s report is the latest to raise alarms over the health impacts of China’s worsening air pollution. 

The Ministry of Environment said last month that only 27 out of 113 major cities met government air quality standards in 2012. And a World Bank report in 2007 assessed that between 350,000 and 400,000 people die prematurely in China each year because of air pollution.

Wang Xinchao, from Beijing-based Ngo Global Village, says that China’s urban residents are becoming increasingly concerned with air pollution and are ready to take action to protect their health.

Although China still relies heavily on coal especially for winter heating, “using coal is not very efficient but the level of pollution coming out of it is obvious. Ordinary citizens need to make a responsible choice about this,” she says.

To some, the growing seriousness of the problem is a sign that the authorities will address it.  Wang Xinchao is confident the authorities will be forced to act.

“The impact on city life is so big that from now on we can only see a progress towards its improvement” she says.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Sun from: Taipei
July 14, 2013 11:32 PM
Gross domestic product grew 7.5% over the previous year during the second quarter, the National Bureau of Statistics reported Monday (CNN). Chinese bubble economy looks like to collapse soon. This is the consequence of CPR's wasting money in military expansionism. Many analysts say Chinese GDP will fall into 7% in the second half of this year. Then, I'm afraid that economical divide among Chinese people will be enlarged and riots will occur more often in China.


by: ununennium from: China
July 14, 2013 12:30 PM
This is an inevitable stage that a developing country will comes through. Perhaps China at present is implementing the "develop first, clean up later" policy


by: Wangchuk from: NY
July 11, 2013 9:55 AM
Unfortunately the CCP only pays lip service to fighting pollution & protecting the environment. There are environmental laws but rarely enforced and the Chinese EPA has only about 300 people for a country of 1.4 billion. As long as the CCP's sole goal is improving or maintaining a high GDP, pollution will be a major problem in China. The CCP needs a high GDP to maintain political power & that is more important to the Party than the Chinese environment or Chinese lifespans.


by: Schneider from: B.R.Deutschland
July 10, 2013 3:16 AM
China must invest lots of money in resolving air pollution problem instead of wasting much money in expanding its military forces. If China wants to be respected as one of the world's economic giants, China must ask for help from environmentally developed countries such as Germany and Japan so that it can fulfill its responsibility in the world.


by: lapazjim from: USA
July 09, 2013 10:00 AM
At the current rate that China is seeing pollution their people are going to start dropping like flies soon.Their cities may become uninhabitable and thus cause a mass exodus to other lesser polluted areas.The damage is done and will take a very very long time before it cleans up.This is a price they are paying for their new found manufacturing age.At the same time there were no restrictions or rules as to what could or could not be released into the air.With the same also being what they could not dump into their waters. Welome to the industrial age CHINA!!

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