News / Asia

Possible Debris from Missing Jet Found Off Australia

  • Mike Barton, rescue coordination chief, right, shows Australia's Deputy Prime Minister, Warren Truss, the map of the Indian Ocean search areas during a tour of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority's rescue coordination center in Canberra, March 23, 2014.
  • Royal Australian Air Force pilot Capt. Russell Adams, left, speaks to the media after returning from a search mission in an AP-3C Orion at Pearce Base, Perth, Australia, March 23, 2014.
  • Ground crew members wave to a Japanese Maritime Defense Force P3C patrol plane as it leaves the Royal Malaysian Air Force base heading for Australia to join a search and rescue operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, Subang, Malaysia, March 23, 2014.
  • Royal Australian Air Force commander Craig Heap speaks to the media after Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's P-3C Orion arrived to help with search operations for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at Pearce Base in Perth, Australia, March 23, 2014.
  • Royal Australian Air Force Loadmasters prepare to launch a Self Locating Data Marker Buoy from a C-130J Hercules aircraft over the southern Indian Ocean, March 20, 2014. (AFP PHOTO / AUSTRALIAN DEFENSE/LEADING SEAMAN JUSTIN BROWN)
  • John Young, general manager of the emergency response division of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, answers a question as he stands in front of a diagram showing the search area for flight MH370 during a briefing in Canberra, March 20, 2014.
  • A Royal Australian Air Force pilot steers his AP-3C Orion over the southern Indian Ocean during the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in this picture released by the Australian Defense Force, March 20, 2014.
  • A Chinese family member of a passenger onboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 screams as she is being brought into a room outside the media conference area at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur International Airport, March 19, 2014.
  • An image in support of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 is seen on the United Malays National Organisation building in Kuala Lumpur, March 19, 2014.
  • Students watch as a group of artists finish a piece based on the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that was painted on a school ground in Makati city, metro Manila, Philippines, March 17, 2014.
VOA News
Ships are on their way to the southern Indian Ocean off Australia to look for possible debris from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

An Australian satellite spotted two large pieces of what investigators say could be part of the plane. One piece is about 24 meters long and another one is five meters long. The pictures were taken earlier this week and were released Thursday.

Darkness, clouds, and rain prevented rescue planes from seeing anything.

A Norwegian cargo ship happened to be near the area when news of the debris was announced, but failed to spot anything during a night-long search.

The owner of the Norwegian ship said saving the lives of the missing passengers is the focus of its operation.

The debris is thought to be about 2,500 kilometers southwest of the Australian city of Perth.

The Malaysia Airlines jet with 239 people on board disappeared 13 days ago during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. So far, there has been no signs of the plane or any firm clues of what happened to it.

Malaysia Airlines, search area as of March 20, 2014Malaysia Airlines, search area as of March 20, 2014
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Malaysia Airlines, search area as of March 20, 2014
Malaysia Airlines, search area as of March 20, 2014
Investigators are not ruling out anything, including catastrophic mechanical failure or terrorism. But they say it is possible that someone who knew what he was doing caused the plane to fly far off course  

Twenty-six nations have been hunting for the plane across an area covering more than 7 million square kilometers, from Kazakhstan to the southern Indian Ocean.

Most of the passengers were Chinese. Their families are extremely frustrated with the investigation, accusing Malaysian authorities of lying. Police forcibly carried out hysterical and sobbing relatives from a government briefing on Wednesday.

Australian Air Commodore John McGarry on the search for debris:  
 
"Quite simply, it is credible enough to divert the research to this area on the basis it provides a promising lead to what might be wreckage from the debris field," said  McGarry.



Click here to see more about the international search effort for MH370

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Tluang Kung from: Myanmar
March 21, 2014 7:57 AM
May the passengers on board be safe and sound. Deep concern for all respective relatives and friends!


by: meanbill from: USA
March 21, 2014 12:02 AM
THE WISE MAN did say it; ... It just seems that the possible flight 370 debris, is being discovered everywhere where a hijacker wouldn't take a plane, doesn't it?
QUESTION? ... Why would a well planed hijacker who evaded and avoided all this detection, commit suicide, or crash in the ocean?
LOGIC suggests, that the flight 370 hijacker had plans, and was executing the plans for a totally different purpose.. ........ REALLY


by: Rudy Haugeneder from: Canada
March 20, 2014 11:14 PM
Was it a mini-bast from the Sun that nobody noticed and wrecked much of the aircraft's delicate technology, meaning the direction it flew was uncontrollable and finally crashed into the water in a place we'll never know about?
Meanwhile, 20 months ago, our planet came within a week of never again watching a jet airliner scouring the atmosphere:
According to a major scientific magazine, a massive ejection of material from the sun initially traveling at over 7 million miles per hour that narrowly missed Earth last year is an event solar scientists hope will open the eyes of policymakers regarding the impacts and mitigation of severe space weather, says a University of Colorado Boulder professor.

The coronal mass ejection, or CME, event was likely more powerful than the famous Carrington storm of 1859, when the sun blasted Earth’s atmosphere hard enough twice to light up the sky from the North Pole to Central America and allowed New Englanders to read their newspapers at night by aurora light, said CU-Boulder Professor Daniel Baker. Had it hit Earth, the July 2012 event likely would have created a technological disaster by short-circuiting satellites, power grids, ground communication equipment and even threatening the health of astronauts and aircraft crews, he said.

CMEs are part of solar storms and can send billions of tons of solar particles in the form of gas bubbles and magnetic fields off the sun’s surface and into space. The storm events essentially peel Earth’s magnetic field like an onion, allowing energetic solar wind particles to stream down the field lines to hit the atmosphere over the poles.

Fortunately, the 2012 solar explosion occurred on the far side of the rotating sun just a week after that area was pointed toward Earth, said Baker, a solar scientist and the director of CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. But NASA’s STEREO-A, satellite that was flying ahead of the Earth as the planet orbited the sun, captured the event, including the intensity of the solar wind, the interplanetary magnetic field and a rain of solar energetic particles into space.

- See more at: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2013/12/09/cu-boulder-scientist-2012-solar-storm-points-need-society-prepare#sthash.

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