News / USA

Liberian Doctor Dies of Ebola

In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia.
In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia.
VOA News

A senior doctor working at Liberia's largest hospital has died of Ebola.

The Liberian Health Ministry says Dr. Samuel Brisbane died Saturday at an Ebola treatment center on the outskirts of the capital, Monrovia.

He is the first Liberian doctor to die in an outbreak the World Health Organization says has killed 129 people in the country.

The U.S. based aid group Samaritan's Purse said Saturday an American doctor working in Liberia is also sick.

A spokeswoman for the group says Dr. Kent Brantly is undergoing intensive medical treatment.  She says patients have a better chance of survival if they receive treatment immediately after being infected, which Brantly did.

Ebola cases in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia as of July 24, 2014.Ebola cases in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia as of July 24, 2014.
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Ebola cases in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia as of July 24, 2014.
Ebola cases in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia as of July 24, 2014.


The World Health Organization says highly contagious Ebola virus has killed at least 672 people in four African countries this year.

In Sierra Leone, health officials say an Ebola patient whose family sparked a nationwide hunt when they forcefully removed her from a treatment center and took her to a traditional healer, died in an ambulance on the way to a hospital.

Health officials say fear and mistrust of health workers in Sierra Leone, where many people have more faith in traditional medicine, are hurting efforts to contain the Ebola outbreak.  

The WHO says the outbreak, the largest ever recorded, has also killed 319 people in Guinea and 224 in Sierra Leone.

Meanwhile, Nigeria has stepped up surveillance at its ports and borders, following the country's first confirmed death from the Ebola virus.

Deadliest Ebola OutbreaksDeadliest Ebola Outbreaks
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Deadliest Ebola Outbreaks
Deadliest Ebola Outbreaks


Health officials are monitoring airports, seaports and land borders for people arriving who may show signs of the virus.  Officials confirmed Friday that a man who died after arriving in Lagos on a flight from Liberia had tested positive for Ebola.

Investigators are trying to track down the other passengers who were on the nearly three-hour flight from Monrovia.

There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola, which causes symptoms that include fever, vomiting, diarrhea and bleeding.

Health workers are at serious risk of contracting the disease, which spreads through contact with bodily fluids.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

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by: Jphn P. from: USA
July 28, 2014 3:02 PM
I am very sorry to hear of the loss of such a precious, precious physician in the service of humanity. It is very painful, but he truly is a hero and champion for he knew the risks, yet he plunged into trying to save others in selfless, kind, loving, and generous devotion. I am so touched to hear of his heroic battle! May he rest in peace and be received with great cheer in the journey beyond. Let those of us who remain remember him and honor him! Let us praise him!

by: Joseph Kannah from: Monrovia
July 27, 2014 11:25 PM
is this a contradiction?
that people stand the chance of surviving if they start the treatment but there's no treatment.

I Ebola problem us governmentally politically motivated.
there's something our under developed governments not fair to tell.

meanwhile, kidneys have been extracted from people allegedly infected by Ebola.
that's demonic.

by: Sam G from: USA
July 27, 2014 4:29 PM
History will remember hero's like this doctor and all those medical professionals volunteering their time to combat this demon virus.

IMHO, President Obama should be doing more to combat this pandemic, why he can't be bothered with helping our friends in the dark continent with this and the Boku Haram kidnapped children is unfortunate.




by: Not Again from: Canada
July 27, 2014 2:08 PM
Dr. S. Brisbane, a great humanitarian, that helped people under the worst of situations has given his life; I hope the World, the UN recognizes him for his dedication, courage and humanity.
I do hope that Dr. K. Brantly recovers, for he too has gone way beyond his calling, in helping those afflicted by Ebola.
These great individuals deserve all recognition, and their dedication/ sacrifice needs to be remembered for everafter.
I think that much more needs to be done to help the countries, in which this terrible disease, Ebola, is spreading.
One can predict that- If the wealthy countries do not put an extraordinary effort in assisting in stopping the spread, of Ebola, and in putting a crash scientific effort into finding a drug or combination of drugs to at least slow it down, if not cure it, Ebola will become a global disease, it will slowly/over time come about to all corners of the planet.
People are forgetting a very basic and fundamental aspect of viruses, similar as it is the case with bacteria, which is that a very infinitesimaly small fraction, of any population can be inmune and could become carriers; without showing symptoms of the disease. Much like the apes from which the disease has jumped onto the human population, the apes do not show the the same ravages of Ebola.
The longer that Ebola lingers in the human population, the greter the chance it may become more and more easily transmissible through the air and its out of host survivabability time will increase; notwithstanding that it may become less deadly, it is still a real bad situation.
With globalization, we are taking a tremendous risk, by not putting maximum efforts into dealing with this terrible disease.

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