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Americans Reflect on Passing of Mandela

Americans Reflect on Passing of Mandelai
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December 07, 2013 12:15 AM
Across the United States, Americans are marking the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela with personal reflection and public tributes. VOA’s Brian Padden reports.
Americans Reflect on Passing of Mandela
Brian Padden
Across the United States, Americans are marking the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela with personal reflection and public tributes.

Visitors have been leaving flowers at the South African Embassy in Washington, creating a makeshift memorial in front of a statue of the anti-apartheid leader and former president.  

“I think it’s very sad. He had a long hard life, but he did some wonderful things. So it’s a sad day for the world,” said Washington resident Priscilla Sabatilli.

The statue is a replica of one that stands outside the South African prison where Mandela spent 27 years of his life as a political prisoner.

In New York, commuters paused to remember the prisoner turned president, who negotiated a peaceful end to apartheid and urged forgiveness for the white government that imprisoned him.

“I think more the lesson that Mandela left for us is that we can have polar opposite viewpoints and still find a way to sort of end up where we need to be,” said Max Moondoc, a New York resident.

During his radio program in California, civil rights activist Earl Ofari Hutchinson remembered Mandela as a revered champion of human rights.

"People felt, we’re in the presence of a giant. We’re in the presence of a special person, someone who really is a gift to the world,” said Hutchinson.

Across America there are words of praise and quiet prayers at the passing of this international icon of peace and reconciliation.

  • People sing and dance during a gathering of mourners on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • A young girl with a poster of Nelson Mandela marches with others to celebrate his life, in the street outside his old house in Soweto, Johannesburg, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • Township residents march to celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela in the street outside his old house in Soweto, Johannesburg, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • A woman cries as she holds a candle and a flower outside former South African President Nelson Mandela's house in Houghton, Dec. 5, 2013a
  • A girl holds a South African national flag as people mourn the death of Nelson Mandela outside Cape Town City Hall, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • Keaton Anderson, 10, poses for a photograph for his father Dijon Anderson as they visit the statue of Nelson Mandela at the South African Embassy in Washington, Dec. 5, 2013.
  • Newspapers with pictures of Nelson Mandela on the front page on sale in London, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • Schoolchildren hold candles and portraits of Nelson Mandela during a prayer ceremony at a school in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • A woman with a banner pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside the South African High Commission in London, Dec. 6, 2013.
  • People release paper lanterns after lighting them outside Madiba, a restaurant named in honor of Nelson Mandela, in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Dec. 5, 2013.
  • People listen to a radio as South African President Jacob Zuma announces the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela in Houghton, Dec. 5, 2013.
  • A man holds candles in front of a mural of former South African President Nelson Mandela and U.S. President Barack Obama in New York, Dec. 5, 2013.
  • Pedestrians pass beneath the Apollo Theater marquee commemorating the life of South African leader Nelson Mandela in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, Dec. 5, 2013.

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by: Dr. from San Diego from: San Diego, CA
December 07, 2013 11:38 AM
There is absolutely no comparison between George Washington and Nelson Mandela.

George Washington was a Founding Father. He presided over the convention that drafted the Constitution and warned the nation against partisanship, sectionalism, and involvement in foreign wars.

Nelson Mandela was… well, a communist and a terrorist.

Mandela was a member of the South African Communist Party. He co-founded Umkhonto we Sizwe, a terrorist organization that killed civilians, including children. Fast food outlets and supermarkets were favored targets. In addition to terrorist bombings, the military wing of the African National Congress tortured and executed suspected government agents.

Post-apartheid South Africa is ruled by the ANC and the South African Communist Party. The ruling ANC defines itself as a “disciplined force of the left.”

Listening to Obama, however, you wouldn’t know that Nelson Mandela is a former communist and terrorist. He has compared the aging terrorist to George Washington.

“Mandela shows what was possible when a priority is placed on human dignity, respect for law, that all people are treated equally,” Obama said on a trip to South Africa.

“And what Nelson Mandela also stood for is that the well-being of the country is more important than the interests of any one person,” Obama continued. “George Washington is admired because after two terms he said enough, I’m going back to being a citizen. There were no term limits, but he said I’m a citizen. I served my time. And it’s time for the next person, because that’s what democracy is about. And Mandela similarly was able to recognize that, despite how revered he was, that part of this transition process was greater than one person.”

Obama does what he is told. He reads from a script. It doesn’t matter if he personally prefers communism or the brand of socialism so-called conservatives accuse him of subscribing to. Obama’s political opinions are irrelevant.

Obama’s globalist handlers like socialism – a kinder and gentler word for communism – because it is an effective tool for controlling the masses. Globalist kingpin David Rockefeller said as much when he praised Mao and Chinese communism, a political machine responsible for killing more humans than both Hitler and Stalin.

“Whatever the price of the Chinese Revolution, it has obviously succeeded, not only in producing a more efficient and dedicated administration but also in fostering high morale and community of purpose,” Rockefeller said on the pages of the New York Times in 1973. “The social experiment in China under Chairman Mao’s leadership is one of the most important and successful in human history.”

Rockefeller was also fond of the Soviets and their thugocracy established by Wall Street. “My congratulations on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the October Revolution,” he told the Kremlin in 1977.

Solzhenitsyn and others put the death toll in the Soviet Union between 1917 and 1987 at over 60 million.

Naturally, ABC and the rest of the Mockingbird corporatized media didn’t bother to mention Mandela’s terrorist and communist past. It did not mention the ANC’s habit of necklacing its enemies back in the day, a practice enthusiastically endorsed by Nelson Mandela’s wife, Winnie Mandela.

Necklacing was the practice of putting a tire filled with gasoline around the neck of accused collaborators and enemies of the ANC. After ignited, it often took more than 20 minutes for the necklace to kill its victim.


by: musawi melake
December 07, 2013 9:23 AM
After all, according to the Free-Masonic belief system, Great leader like Mr. Mandela are none other than a bunch of terrorists!, but those who administer poison to dignitaries and cover that up when things are going to be exposed, are exemplary statesmen.

by: Rudy Haugeneder from: Canada
December 06, 2013 10:54 PM
Over the years and until recently, confused western presidents and prime ministers who praise Nelson Mandela today saw him as a dangerous threat to freedom and democracies.
Did you know Nelson Mandela wasn't taken off the official U.S. government terrorist list until 2008, research shows.
In fact the United States government, which for decades was a fast friend of apartheid and a loyal supporter of that regime, as were the Israelis, designated as terrorist whoever the white apartheid South African regime designated as terrorist, according to the Real News Network research. And that included all of the resistance, all of the leaders of Mandela's African National Congress, and the Congress of South African Trade Unions.

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