News / Africa

    Analysts Debate Way Forward for South Sudan

    William Eagle
    South Sudan has been independent for nearly three years.  The Sudan People’s Liberation Movement, which had fought a decades-long war from the Republic of Sudan,  assumed control of the government and began state-building.
     
    By last July, ruling party rifts were playing out in public.
     
    President Salva Kiir sacked a cabinet of dissenting voices, including vice president Riek Machar.  In December, Machar and others had complained about a lack of democracy in decision-making in the government and party.  Days later, fighting broke out in military barracks in Juba and the president accused Machar of attempting a coup – a charge Machar has denied.  Machar and forces loyal to him fled the capital and regrouped to fight the government.
     
    Observers say tensions had been growing for some time.
     
    US special envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, Donald Booth, was a participant at a recent roundtable discussion on the situation at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies in Washington.  

    Shrinking polical space
     
    He said the violence represents a failure of leadership on all sides:    
     
     "Development efforts were given a back seat to individual ambitions," he explained. "The government attempted to contain and quell intercommunal violence without fully committing to the hard work of addressing its causes: economic disparity, historical grievances against other communities and political grievances due to real or perceived underrepresentation and disproportionate political influence at all levels of government.

    "Institutions that were understandably weak at independence were allowed to stagnate, while the political elite vied instead for power in an ever - shrinking political space."
     
    The Government of South Sudan rejects the accusation that there was a lack of political diversity in the government.
     
    The Ambassador of South Sudan to the United States, Akec Khoc Aciew  Khoc, who was a guest of the Washington discussion,  said the government did include consultations with other parties.  He cited policies put in place following the Comprehensive Peace Agreement with the Republic of Sudan in 2005.   
     
    "All the actors following the conclusion of the CPA,"  asserted Khoc, have had [a high level of] political space allotted to them.  The government included all the political parties in its governance.  Many of [those who] today feel excluded were very much in  charge of running the show:  the implementation of CPA, organizing elections [in 2010] and the referendum [on independence in 2011], overseeing economic development.  It is not fair to assume that political space was reduced for those who are in opposition today.

    From liberation to governance
     
    Another panel participant, Jok Maduk Jok, said it was clear the liberation movement that had led South Sudan to independence was having trouble in its transition to ruling party – and to governing effectively.
     
    Jok, the executive director of the Sudd Institute in Juba and professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in California, said "the lavish expenditures in state capitals and Juba is quite visible [ but few services in rural areas].  All of this was bound to cause an explosion – it was just a matter of time   .  What we didn’t know was what shape it would take:  a popular uprising like the North African [Arab Spring] protests, or more rebellions by army commanders.  [Would there be] more intensity in tribal militia wars or more civil contests of power within the SPLM leadership?"
     
    The South Sudan analyst also said the military had become unmanageable, and costly.  He said it’s the largest institution in the country,  and absorbs up to 60% of the national budget.  The government integrated opposition militias into the army, which led to a military – in his words --  “without ethos” or shared values.  However, Jok said over half of the army is still made up of one ethnic group [Dinka], and fails to reflect national diversity.
     
    The analyst said the government has also failed to find work for youth.  He said over 70% of the population is under 30 years of age, and are susceptible to calls to take up arms to improve their lives. 
     
    According to Jok,  the government has also failed to effectively advance reconciliation.  Instead, violence continued after the signing of the CPA.  
     
    Ambassador Booth said the way forward includes an end to impunity for those behind attacks on civilians.

    A way forward
     
    "Those responsible for perpetrating human rights violations need to be held accountable, and the nation must invest in political reconciliation processes that can can support political dialogue and reform going forward," he said. "The African Union is establishing a commission of inquiry for South Sudan which we believe can serve as credible mechanism to ensure accountability for atrocities.  We urge that this mechanism move forward expeditiously on its work."
     
    Some human rights activists support the work of the government-appointed Committee for National Healing, Peace and Reconciliation, which is chaired by Archbishop of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan [and Bishop of Juba Diocese], Daniel Deng Bul and co-chaired by Bishop Emeritus of the Roman Catholic Church, Paride Taban.
     
    However,  analyst Jok Maduk Jok is skeptical of its ability to promote reconciliation.
     
    "There’s nothing wrong with having church leaders lead reconciliation," said Jok.   But we have to look at the personalities and the history of ethnic relations in South Sudan… Daniel Deng comes from an ethnic group [Dinka] accused by other ethnic groups of all types of issues – and to lead it you need someone who is more acceptable to everyone.   So a look at a more comprehensive reconciliation process that every one will buy into [is necessary]….

    "The impunity of past must stop, because it is one of the reasons for the revenge and counter revenge going on.  This would need to be built into any political settlement that emerges from Addis."
     
    US envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Donald Booth said Washington supports mediators in the Ethiopian capital – who have been instructed to develop a framework for the next phase of negotiations in South Sudan.  He said the process should include public consultations, including participants from across society:  women, youth, the internally displaced, the diaspora, and opposition political parties 
     
    Ambassador Khoc said the government supports such an approach– and has invited leaders of the political opposition including Lam Akol of the SPLM-DC, or Sudan People’s Liberation Movement – Democratic Change, and [Luo] militia leader David Yao Yao.
     
    Roundtable panelists also warned against allowing the manipulation of humanitarian aid by armed actors.  They said it relieves them of the responsibility of feeding their people, allowing them to spend funds on waging war…and prolonging conflict.   They said Khartoum used this to its advantage in the long war against southern independence, extending the region’s fight to become a separate nation by years.
     
    Booth warned against what he called “business as usual” and “a quick fix and political accommodation for elites.”   That would be a recipe, he said, for renewed conflict. 

    Litsen to report on South Sudan
    Litsen to report on South Sudani
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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: GatNor from: Juba, South Sudan
    February 24, 2014 1:02 PM
    Any government that wages any sort of war on its ethnic citizens looses its credibility it has promised under oath to protect all citizens, uphold the rule of laws, and to defend the national constitution and to protect the national sovereignty of the territory of South Sudan. Why waste time on leadership that commits genocide on its citizens. Yes past history is good to note in references to the current crises but history does not justify the action of the government of South Sudan to date.

    Government agents and its propagandists can launch media attacks based on their Machar phobia of the past and current events but it will not change the call for an interim government that reflects a fair power-sharing inclusiveness and participation of all citizen. Unlike the current government of genocidal Kiir ridiculously dominated mainly by one ethnic group(Jaang/Dinkas) as if they are the only people in the demographic setting of south Sudan. This must change and the world can not do nothing to peacefully or violently prevent that. You will believe sooner or later why it must change if you dare disagreeing with me.
    In Response

    by: Raymond Ochan from: Juba
    February 24, 2014 11:41 PM
    This crisis was design by US government in the like of people like Amb. Booth. US government never supported the development of SPLM institutions right from the beginning. the Obama administration on uses Salva Kiir administration in the south as a liverish over north by constantly asking south Sudan to concede to every demand north made during the post CPA talks.

    US administration push Salva Kiir to removed the corrupt leaders and when the entire cabinet were reshuffle in July 2013 the same US administration turn around and said Salva Kiir is destroying the SPLM and suddenly the corrupt leaders of SPLM became democratic heros.. What does the American want? there is hidden agenda for the America and instead of fighting South Sudanese by proxy why don't come clear and request south Sudan as an ally to correct what is wrong rather then shopping for leaders without participation of South Sudanese. America can not impose leader on south Sudanese. We all know the weakness and strength of Salva kiir and we wait for election to express our views.
    In Response

    by: Johh from: Juba
    February 24, 2014 4:00 PM
    You do not make any sense since Nuer actually have greater power on the current and prior government of South Sudan. Before the conflict, the vice president was from the Nuer. Are you saying when the president of South Sudan removed his vice president he has violated the power sharing equilibrium?
    I agree with you that the government mishandled the crisis, but I still sense and read tribalism agenda on your comment. It is true that any government that exterminates its citizen’s base on their ethinicty is not liable to remain in power.
    What you have you done when you rebelled? You have avenged. You could not be credible alternative since you have done the very same thing the government has done in Juba, killing innocent civilian. I hope the president should go, but not the current rebellion leader should lead South Sudan.
    I do not think he is any different from the current one. We need to structure the SPLM and allow another part to rise; there may be hope for all of us. SPLM is a failed party. All is accountable in that failure, not only is the president.
    Is you rebellion leader has any representation of other tribes on it?

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