News / Middle East

Analysts Foresee Ongoing Chaos in Egypt

Analysts See Chaos Continuing in Egypti
X
August 17, 2013
Middle East analysts say this week’s violence in Egypt, which killed hundreds of people, appears likely to continue and there is virtually no chance of reconciliation between the Egyptian military and the Muslim Brotherhood. They say ongoing clashes will challenge the nation’s military-backed government and have regional implications as well. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports from Washington.

Analysts See Chaos Continuing in Egypt

TEXT SIZE - +
Meredith Buel
— Middle East analysts say this week’s violence in Egypt, which killed hundreds of people, appears likely to continue and there is virtually no chance of reconciliation between the Egyptian military and the Muslim Brotherhood. They say ongoing clashes will challenge the nation’s military-backed government and have regional implications as well.

Clashes between security forces and Islamist supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi are going strong in Cairo and across Egypt.

Analysts say it now seems clear the Egyptian military has decided the Muslim Brotherhood represents such a threat to the country there is no chance for reconciliation between secular and Islamist forces.

Robert Satloff of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy said, “They believe that they have antithetical enemies, adversaries, that there is no room in the political system for the leadership of the Muslim Brotherhood."

Satloff said the Brotherhood has three options - go underground, try to reengage in politics or fight. He said if the violence continues, there will be more terrible bloodshed that will threaten the stability of Egypt.

“We have a test of wills right now. The military’s task is to vanquish the Brotherhood leadership quickly so that this doesn’t spiral out of control and make a truly Algeria or Syria-style civil war,” he said.

The crackdown on pro-Morsi demonstrators and the skyrocketing death toll have drawn global condemnation.

The United States stopped short of cutting off $1.5 billion in annual aid to Egypt, but has cancelled joint military exercises.

U.S. President Barack Obama said, “Going forward I have asked my national security team to assess the implications of the actions taken by the interim government and further steps that we may take as necessary with respect to the U.S.-Egyptian relationship.”

Hundreds of demonstrators were killed when security forces used snipers, bulldozers and tear gas to clear them from two camps in Cairo.

The crackdown sparked running battles in the capital and elsewhere.

Deadly force has been authorized to protect police and state institutions.

In addition to security concerns, analysts say the ruling generals will now face an array of problems.

Manal Omar at the U.S. Institute of Peace has just returned from Egypt. "The military will have challenges beyond how they handle the Muslim Brotherhood. They are going to have the same challenges that Morsi faced in terms of economic development, in terms of really being able to show the average Egyptian citizen change in their daily life.”

The chaos in Cairo comes at a time the Middle East is already deeply shaken by the civil war in Syria.

“There will be these two major domestic issues, the path in Egypt and the path in Syria, will for quite some time determine the shape of regional events and our own interests in the area,” said Satloff.

The international community has urged both sides in Egypt to show restraint and end the turmoil engulfing the nation.

You May Like

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

Turkish Law Gives Spy Agency Controversial Powers

Parliament approves legislation to bolster powers of intelligence service, which government claims is necessary to modernize and deal with new threats Turkey faces More

Video Face of American Farmer Changing

Average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Anonymous
August 19, 2013 12:30 PM
The United Arab Emirates has been heavily criticized by rights groups that say it condones sexual violence against women. Human Rights Watch has called its record "shameful," saying it must change the way it handles such cases.

In December 2012, a British woman reported being raped by three men in Dubai. She was found guilty of drinking alcohol without a license and fined.

In January 2010, a British woman told authorities she was raped by an employee at a Dubai hotel. She was charged with public intoxication and having sex outside of marriage.

An Australian woman reported in 2008 that she was drugged and gang-raped. She was convicted of having sex outside marriage and drinking alcohol, and she was sentenced to 11 months in prison.
What's next for women's rights in the Middle East?......... i feel sorry for the Arab kids, men ,children who live in their occupaied nations by their own corrupt LEADERs


by: Stephen Real from: Columbia USA
August 17, 2013 12:49 AM
This situation in Egypt is about to cross the Rubicon of no return. It would be unacceptable for Allied Forces to spend our hard earned reputation of trust as a fair broker so cheaply for this wholesale murder of ordinary men, women and children. We payed for our reputation in blood. If this goes on any further the US military will publicly pull back it's support for Egypt No doubt about it.

Secretary Chuck Hagel has to weigh blowing up our reputation with the Egyptian people while maintaining regional balance with Israel. Because of the huge data dumps lately I was shocked to see just how many ordinary people heavily rely on our judgement as a people to make a fair call. Even if they "hate us", and you see it in the polling, the people believe we keep our word. I read reactions to these data dumps from all over the world. Do no screw up our reputation fellas.
Good Luck


by: Rudy Haugeneder from: Canada
August 16, 2013 11:30 PM
Why is it okay to show the pictures of dead civilian Muslim Egyptians, often close-ups, but when it comes to other stories involving White European and/or American dead -- civilian or military -- those photographs are rarely, if ever, published or broadcast in the Western media?

Is this a reflection of an anti-Muslim Western media sentiment that suggests Muslim lives are unworthy of the same descent media treatment as White westerners? Appears so.


by: Jonas
August 16, 2013 10:55 PM
The Arab world is clearly not ready for democracy. Mursi won the elections fair and square. This latest event indicates once more that Arab countries, including Egypt, have not been prepared for a democratic system characterized by the model of one-person-one-vote elections.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Face of American Farmer is Changingi
X
Mike Osborne
April 18, 2014
The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid