News / Middle East

Anger Over Anti-Islam Film Simmering

Egyptian riot police smash furniture and other items as they clear Tahrir Square in Cairo, September 15, 2012.
Egyptian riot police smash furniture and other items as they clear Tahrir Square in Cairo, September 15, 2012.
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VOA News
Calm is returning to parts of the Muslim world after days of sometimes violent and deadly protests over an anti-Islamic video posted on the Internet.

Firefighters in Egypt Saturday doused small fires dotting Cairo's Tahrir Square, sending plumes of smoke into the air.  The clean-up followed a night of clashes between demonstrators and police that left one protester dead.

In Sudan, which also saw deadly protests, police patrolled the streets of Khartoum Saturday while traffic passed by the U.S., British and German embassies, all still showing signs of damage.

Other countries which had seen days of protests, including Tunisia and Yemen, were also quieter Saturday.  Still, new protests raged Saturday in Afghanistan, India and Sydney, Australia.

Also Saturday, al-Qaida's branch in Yemen called for more attacks on U.S. embassies, citing Tuesday's deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya as the best example.

In that attack, protesters breached the consulate's security and killed U.S. Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens and three of his staffers. Some U.S. and Libyan officials say the attack was planned and that the attackers used the protest as a cover.

Late Friday, U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told Foreign Policy Magazine's National Security channel that Washington is positioning its forces to protect American personnel and respond to continued unrest, as needed.

Other governments have also increased security.  Egyptian forces sealed off the area near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Friday and took dozens of protesters into custody overnight.

At least five protesters have died in this week's protests, including two in Tunisia, one in Lebanon and Egypt, and at least one in Sudan.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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by: D Ross from: Bangkok Thailand
September 16, 2012 11:11 PM
In spite of what the Bible says, the lion will never lie down with the lamb. Hourly, the Jewish religion is blasphemed by the Arab world ... yet, do we see Jewish and Zionist gangs torching embassies, murdering and assaulting diplomats? Do we see Jews rioting in western cities and beating unbelievers senseless? Do we see beheadings, amputations, stonings, and Jewish women veiled and owned as chattel? Certainly not.
Just hours ago, Sydney Australia was awash with murderous street violence and children carrying signs asking for the beheading of non-believers - and these are immigrants, guests in Australia.
Time to come out of your politically correct daze folks.


by: Kay DeVenish from: Bundaberg
September 15, 2012 8:02 PM
Re- the muslim protests in Sydney over 'that film'...I am not muslim,I mostly am a silent fan of Christ but I am no church goer and I have many friends who are atheist and agnostic...I respect all people religious or not. I have one question to ask on the current issue. What ever happened to old fashioned manners? The solution to the problem is just for us all to use common courtesy. No one has to believe or think exactly like his fellow man/woman because everyone has their own unique mind but if manners were used everyone would keep the personal stuff personal and respect another's right to do the same...we don't have to agree with another's beliefs or have them agree with our own beliefs we just have to go peacefully by them (neighbours/fellow humans)nod a polite hello or give a smile and go on our own way with our own thoughts inside our head...how hard is that to do?not hard at all,respect each other and don't throw mud on each other's homes,lets all plant a beautiful garden and watch the roses grow... lets all pass by and enjoy the beauty and then go to our own private homes and do our own thing whatever that is...pray or not pray or believe or not believe quietly so everyone can live in peace...as that is the only way to live,anyone who mocks another person's personal ideals or beliefs is a vexation to the spirit of peace and harmony. Treat everyone with respect and kindness and don't be cruel to anyone even if you don't think they are right they must be treated with respect and if that is done peace will prevail.

In Response

by: Mike from: California
September 16, 2012 2:04 PM
Dear Kay,
Sounds like you need to do a little homework on the subject of the religion in question. The VOA is very sensitive on this question and will allow no discussion of the details, but you can do the homework from your browser and draw your own conclusions. Seriously, make the effort and you will understand why so many of the "rioters" reject it. All I can say here is that the culture of the regions in volved is so much different than the rest of the world's that it is difficult for outsiders to really understand.

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