News / Middle East

Annan Finds Mild Response in Russia on Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, with UN special envoy Kofi Annan in Moscow, July 17, 2012Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, with UN special envoy Kofi Annan in Moscow, July 17, 2012
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Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, with UN special envoy Kofi Annan in Moscow, July 17, 2012
Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, with UN special envoy Kofi Annan in Moscow, July 17, 2012
James Brooke
MOSCOW — As fighting between rebels and government forces raged in the Syrian capital, U.N. envoy Kofi Annan held talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow on Syria's crisis. The response from Syria-ally Russia was largely muted.

But Putin vowed to support the peace effort in Syria. “We will do everything that depends on us to support your efforts,” the Russian leader said.

Annan was in Moscow to line up support in advance of a vote Wednesday at the United Nations on extending the U.N. monitoring mission in Syria.

The mandate expires on Friday. And with street fighting taking place in Damascus, the future of the 300 cease-fire monitors may be in doubt.

After meeting with Putin, Annan said he hopes common ground can be found.

"Obviously, the discussions in the Security Council regarding the resolution also came up. And I would hope that the Council will continue its discussions and hopefully find language that will pull everybody together," Annan said.

Russia supports a simple three-month extension of the observers' mandate. Western powers want language that could open the door to military action by outsiders.

In Russia, that topic is taboo.

Fyodor Lyukanov, editor of Russia in Global Affairs magazine, says the Putin government will not budge.

“There is a red line which Russia will never cross. I will say never. This is legitimization of any kind of outside intervention, military intervention in Syria,” Lyukanov said.

For the 16 months of Syria’s uprising, Russia has stood out as the closest ally of the increasingly isolated nation.

But as Moscow digested news of heavy fighting in Damascus, Russian officials took a low profile.

Russia 24, the state-run all news channel, showed no photo of Putin meeting with Annan. Instead, the channel aired lengthy reports on the Russian president coordinating relief to victims of the last week’s flooding in southern Russia.

Separately, a Russian ship carrying refurbished helicopters for Syria took an inexplicable detour to St. Petersburg, adding extra days to its route to the Mediterranean.

Also silent was Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, who on Monday gave a lengthy press conference on Syria.

He told reporters that Russia’s influence in Syria is overestimated. He said that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is not leaving power because he retains substantial popular support.

The Russian foreign minister stressed that Russia was acting on principle -  the non-intervention in the internal affairs of other countries.

Lyukanov, the analyst agrees, saying that arm sales and Russia’s naval base at Tartus, Syria are minor issues.

“How this conflict will be settled will serve as a model for future dealing with internal crisis situations in many countries. And that’s what Russia now considers to be important. It’s not about arms sales. It’s not about Tartus base. It’s not about anything else. It’s not about Assad,” Lyukanov said.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon headed Tuesday to China for talks with President Hu Jintao. China has joined Russia in vetoing Security Council resolutions calling for tough action against Syria.

The official People's Daily newspaper ran a commentary Tuesday rejecting foreign intervention in the Syrian crisis.

On Wednesday, the visitor to Moscow will be Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Although Turkey is coping with tens of thousands of Syrian refugees, analysts here do not predict that he will be able to shift Russia’s hands-off policy.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Lаra
July 18, 2012 9:26 AM
Oh,Putin has already deserved a place next to Hitler in a fish bowl,I guess!

by: john from: Taifa
July 18, 2012 7:14 AM
Putin must go, Putin must go, empty rhetoric, what about senator John McCain? He is also a left over of the Vietnam war which America lost miserably.
In Response

by: Mike
July 18, 2012 2:11 PM
John McCain is American Hero. It is a pity that he did not become U.S. president and was elected Obama - very weak and unintelligent president.
McCain understands the nature of the regime of power in Russia, and he knows that Putin from KGB understands only the language of force.

by: Anonymous
July 18, 2012 3:10 AM
Hey you at the Kremlin... Would you mind terribly if Nato or the West would just put an end of this unneeded terror by taking out Assad? Assad is destroying his own country, and people anyway (Which are no longer his...). Just let us deal with the cruel dictator and finish his cleansing once and for all, you can still park your ships there... Lets save some lives today, and live in harmony. What do you say Kremlin?

by: FreedomLover from: USA
July 17, 2012 8:51 PM
Putin needs to go. He is a KGB left over from the cold war that Russia lost miserably. Putin will only destroy Russia. Putin needs a place next to Stalin in a fish bowl. Maybe Putin needs to take his shirt off again so everyone can see his scawney, hairless sunken chest.
In Response

by: Mike
July 17, 2012 9:59 PM
I agree with you completely. But Putin never voluntarily leave his royal position. This is a life-long dictator. In Russia there are no real elections and the majority of people are zombie of Putin's propaganda. So the change of regime in Russia will happen only through revolution. In the latest russian bloodshed would be guilty Putin and his friends from the KGB.

by: beancube2010
July 17, 2012 7:57 PM
There is no tough action on Syria but on Al-Assad. UN sanctions using firepower against the butcher Al-Assad should not be based on those rebels but on the safety of unarmed civilians' lives. Both Assad and rebels are not genuine for peaceful reforms that ordinary Syrians are looking for. Both of them must be taken away. They are threatening neighbor's stabilities in the region as well. Russia have rights to do so as Syrian civilians demand.

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