News / Middle East

Anti-Morsi Protest in Egypt Turns Deadly, Stocks Tumble

A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police in Cairo, November 25, 2012.
A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police in Cairo, November 25, 2012.
VOA News

Opponents of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi have stormed an office of his Muslim Brotherhood movement in the country's north, triggering a fight that killed one person and wounded at least 40 others.

Brotherhood leaders identified the fatality as a 15-year-old Islamist youth, but it was not clear how he was killed in Sunday's incident in the Nile Delta town of Damanhour.

The teenager is the first person known to be killed since reformist and liberal activists began street protests to denounce Morsi for granting himself sweeping powers in a decree last Thursday.

Opposition activists camped in Cairo's Tahrir Square for a third day Sunday to demand a reversal of the presidential decree. The protesters blocked traffic and engaged in intermittent battles with police in nearby streets.

Egypt's main stock index slumped nearly 10 percent Sunday as investors gave their first response to Morsi's move and subsequent protests. It was one of the market's biggest losses since the days and weeks after longtime president Hosni Mubarak was ousted in a popular uprising last year.

In Washington, influential U.S. Senator John McCain criticized Morsi's decree as "unacceptable," in an interview with the television network Fox News.

"We thank Mr. Morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire (between Israel and Hamas), which by the way is incredibly fragile, but this (decree) is not acceptable. This is not what U.S. taxpayers expect. Our dollars (should) be directly related to the progress toward democracy which you (Morsi) promised the people of Egypt when your party and you were elected president," he said.

The Obama administration has proposed a $1 billion debt relief package for Egypt to help revive its struggling economy. Egypt also has received billions of dollars in U.S. military aid over three decades of close relations.

The U.S. State Department said the Morsi declarations "raise concerns for many Egyptians and for the international community." It said one of the aspirations of the 2011 revolution was "to ensure that power would not be overly concentrated in the hands of any one person or institution."

In his decree, President Morsi said he was barring courts from challenging his decisions, in a move aimed at speeding up Egypt's democratic transition and bringing accountability to former officials accused of crimes under Mubarak. Critics accused Morsi of taking on dictatorial powers like those of his predecessor.

Some Egyptian judges observed a strike on Sunday to protest the decree. But Egypt's Supreme Judicial Council urged them to return to work and said it will meet with Morsi on Monday to try to resolve the dispute. The council of senior judges said it will try to persuade the president to restrict his absolute powers to sovereign matters such as war and peace.

Morsi's office issued a statement Sunday reiterating what he called the "temporary" nature of his decree, which he said will last until Egypt elects a new parliament under a revised constitution. The president also pledged to hold a dialogue with all political forces in Egypt on the drafting of the new constitution.

A spokesman for Morsi's ruling Freedom and Justice Party said the decree likely will last for "two months, maybe less."

"So (to) try to show this (Morsi decree) as a dictatorship is wrong," said Nader Omran. "He is trying to take care of the country. He tried to secure stability for this country. Securing stability is to have a constitution and afterwards to have a parliament, and after the parliament to have a government. And he can pass the authority to these elected institutions. So that's what he wants to do."

Reformists and liberals fear the Islamist-dominated assembly revising the charter will produce a document with an Islamist slant.

Morsi's opponents and supporters have called for rival mass rallies in Cairo Tuesday. 
 

You May Like

Turkey's Controversial Reform Bill Giving Investors Jitters

Homeland security reform bill will give police new powers in search, seizure, detention and arrests, while restricting the rights of suspects, their attorneys More

Audio Slideshow In Kenyan Prison, Good Grades Are Path to Freedom

Some inmates who get high marks could see their sentences commuted to non-custodial status More

'Rumble in the Jungle' Turns 40

'The Champ' knocked Foreman out to regain crown he had lost 7 years earlier when US government accused him of draft-dodging and boxing officials revoked his license More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Salim Gahgah from: Egypt
November 26, 2012 10:12 AM
I told you before... Egyptians are buying guns... everyone is buying guns... soon, soon we will make Syria look like paradise... there is no law, no money, no water, no electricity, we are disintegrating... and Islam is everywhere... hovering, permeating everywhere like the stench of a decaying body... yeah, Islam rule here

In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
November 26, 2012 3:48 PM
bye-bye egypt ,welcome of islamic anarchy, we shall songs
everything is falling apart and the centre can not hold.
islam is not the solution,islam is a prescription for disaster


by: Malch from: Russia
November 26, 2012 12:29 AM
Morsi and his gang care not for the people and freedom. they are the worst nightmare come true for Egyptians.
BTW now Obama and his folks can sing kumbaya together and send kisses to Morsi and other nuts like him...


by: ali baba from: new york
November 25, 2012 12:52 PM
the news in egypt has no end . it is indication is getting worst.moresy and muslim brotherhood will destroy the country. .islam is not a soultion .islam is a prescription for disaster

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Victorious Secularists Face Challenge to Form Government in Tunisiai
X
Henry Ridgwell
October 30, 2014 11:39 PM
Official results from Tunisia show the Islamist Ennahda party has failed to win the second free election since the so-called "Arab Spring" uprising in 2011. Ennahda, which handed power to a government of technocrats pending the elections, lost out to the secular party Nidaa Tounes. Henry Ridgwell reports from London that the relatively peaceful poll offers some hope in a volatile region.
Video

Video Victorious Secularists Face Challenge to Form Government in Tunisia

Official results from Tunisia show the Islamist Ennahda party has failed to win the second free election since the so-called "Arab Spring" uprising in 2011. Ennahda, which handed power to a government of technocrats pending the elections, lost out to the secular party Nidaa Tounes. Henry Ridgwell reports from London that the relatively peaceful poll offers some hope in a volatile region.
Video

Video Africa Tells its Story Through Fashion

In Africa, Fashion Week is a riot of colors, shapes, patterns and fabrics - against the backdrop of its ongoing struggle between nature and its fast-growing urban edge. How do these ideas translate into needle and thread? VOA’s Anita Powell visited this year’s Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Africa in Johannesburg to find out.
Video

Video Smugglers Offer Cheap Passage From Turkey to Syria

Smugglers in Turkey offer a relatively cheap passage across the border into Syria. Ankara has stepped up efforts to stem the flow of foreign fighters who want to join Islamic State militants fighting for control of the Syrian border city of Kobani. But porous borders and border guards who can be bribed make illegal border crossings quite easy. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.

All About America

AppleAndroid