News / Asia

Hong Kong Ends Voting in Referendum, Readies for Rally

A guide leads a woman to a polling station during a civil referendum held by Occupy Central in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
A guide leads a woman to a polling station during a civil referendum held by Occupy Central in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
VOA News

More than 780,000 votes were cast by Sunday, the final day of an unofficial referendum on how Hong Kong's next leader should be chosen.

The ballot has been branded illegal by local and mainland Chinese authorities.

Hong Kong, a free-wheeling, capitalist hub of more than 7 million people, returned to Chinese rule on July 1, 1997, with wide-ranging autonomy under a “one country, two systems”  formula, along with an undated promise of universal suffrage.

China has promised to let all Hong Kong residents vote for their next leader in 2017. But it said candidates must be approved by a nomination committee.

Pro-democracy advocates are incensed at current plans for the election of Hong Kong's next chief executive - who is currently appointed by a 1,200-strong pro-Beijing committee.

Annual protest rally

Tensions are running high in the former British colony before the anniversary of its handover to China, a traditional day of protest.

Organizers of Tuesday's rally expect it to be the largest since the handover with upwards of 500,000 people expected, as frustration grows over Beijing's tightening control over the city.

"Public sentiment has dropped to the lowest point since 2003. I believe more people will come out," Johnson Yeung, one of the organizers, told AFP.

Democracy activists want the nomination process to be open to everyone, in line with international standards, and have threatened to lock down the Central area of Hong Kong, home to some of Asia's biggest companies and banks, if the city fails to adopt a strong democratic method for electing its next leader.

“I think the signal has already been sent to Beijing that Hong Kong people are prepared to express their views on universal suffrage,” said Benny Tai, associate professor of law at the University of Hong Kong and one of the organizers of the vote and the movement, Occupy Central with Love and Peace.

“We hope the result of the civil referendum will be taken seriously by the SAR (Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong) and Chinese government.”

Supporters of Caring Hong Kong Power, a pro-China group, march to the police headquarters during a demonstration against an unofficial referendum and the so-called Occupy Central protest movement in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.Supporters of Caring Hong Kong Power, a pro-China group, march to the police headquarters during a demonstration against an unofficial referendum and the so-called Occupy Central protest movement in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
x
Supporters of Caring Hong Kong Power, a pro-China group, march to the police headquarters during a demonstration against an unofficial referendum and the so-called Occupy Central protest movement in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
Supporters of Caring Hong Kong Power, a pro-China group, march to the police headquarters during a demonstration against an unofficial referendum and the so-called Occupy Central protest movement in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.

The unofficial 10-day vote, organized by pro-democracy activists, was conducted partly online and partly at physical ballot boxes. Voters were given three options on how the next chief executive should be chosen.

Each would allow voters to propose candidates for the top job, and all are therefore considered unacceptable by China and the Hong Kong government.

Voters are required to give their identification number to prevent cheating.

Pro-Beijing groups

At a “polling booth” at Chinese University of Hong Kong on Sunday, a small group of pro-Beijing supporters with mainland accents held up banners denouncing the vote, while four people jumped into the city's Victoria Harbor to protest against the referendum and were quickly rescued.

Another pro-Beijing group, Caring Hong Kong Power, marched through the busy shopping district of Causeway Bay carrying bright orange balloons and urging people not to vote.

Group spokeswoman Lee Ka-ka handed a petition to police signed by 30,000 against the Occupy Central group. She also urged police to “act strongly against the movement.”

Results of the online referendum are expected to be released at around 11 p.m. local time on Sunday, with the overall tally set to be announced on Monday.

Visitors take aim with rifles at a military base during an open day event of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.Visitors take aim with rifles at a military base during an open day event of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
x
Visitors take aim with rifles at a military base during an open day event of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
Visitors take aim with rifles at a military base during an open day event of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.

The last day of voting coincided with China's military opening its barracks in Hong Kong to the public, giving curious tourists a rare glimpse inside two outposts, as tensions between local democracy activists and Beijing continues to heat up.

The 10-day poll, organized by Occupy Central, comes at a time when many Hong Kong residents fear civil liberties are being eroded and amid growing concern about the rule of law in the Asian financial center.

Civil liberty fears

On Friday, Hong Kong lawyers dressed in black marched through the city to protest against the wording in a white paper released this month by Beijing in which it said being patriotic and “loving the country” is a basic requirement for the city's administrators, including lawyers.

The lawyers were taunted by pro-Beijing groups shouting into loud hailers as they marched to the Court of Final Appeal.

Many recent rallies in Hong Kong have seen scuffles break out between pro and anti-Beijing groups, including the 25th anniversary of the June 4, 1989, crackdown on pro-democracy protests in and around Beijing's Tiananmen Square, an event that had always been peaceful in Hong Kong.

Tai said on Sunday the white paper, which reasserted Beijing's control over the former British colony, had “backfired” and prompted more people to vote.

Pro-Beijing newspapers, Chinese officials and Hong Kong business tycoons have strongly criticized the Occupy Central campaign, saying it could hurt the city's standing as a financial center.

The big four audit firms were the latest to join the chorus, when they took out adverts in local Hong Kong newspapers on Friday warning that investors could leave the city if mass protests go ahead.

Activists say it is a peaceful movement demanding a “genuine choice” for Hong Kong's voters.

The unofficial referendum is seen as an important test for pro-democracy activists who believe the public are dissatisfied with the pace of political reform promised by Beijing.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters and AFP.

You May Like

Video US, Japan Offer Lessons as Eurozone Launches Huge Stimulus

Euro falls after European Central Bank announces a bigger-than-expected $67 billion-a-month quantitative easing program More

Saudi King’s Death Clears Succession Route

Prince Mohammed Bin Nayef is Saudi Arabia's New Crown Prince-in-waiting More

Cloud Hangs Over US Counterterrorism Efforts in Yemen

Sources say resignations of Yemen's president, government has left US anti-terror operations 'paralyzed,' yet an American military 'footprint' remains More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: jonathan huang from: canada
June 30, 2014 10:52 AM
in ten days only 10% HKers came to vote including online votes (90%). it says everything, majority about 80% HKer disagree with this "democratic" farce.
HK is part of China, candidates must be authorized by the central congress of china!
BTW, who nominates american president candidates? are those candidates voted by whole americans?


by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
June 29, 2014 9:40 PM
This kind of referendum is feared by China. Particularly since it is completely organized by amateurs and from the grass-roots. Despite its imperfection, at least it shows that one out of ten people in H K demand a fair universal suffrage type of election.


by: Van from: Canada
June 29, 2014 6:48 PM
How did the reporters know mainland accents as he/she said in the news: "pro-Beijing supporters with mainland accents?

Actually many pro-democracy activists in HK are from mainland, and they should have so-called mainland accents. But I doubt if the reporter can tell the difference in Cantonese accents in HK.

The reporter of this news didn't even talk with Pro-Beijing groups,and just talked about so called pro-democracy group members. The so called mainland accents (for pro-beijing group) from the above news was actually from his talking with Pro-democracy groups. The news is not convincing since the reporter didn't talk with both sides and didn't truthfully report both sides thoughts.


by: Van from: Canada
June 29, 2014 6:37 PM
What has hongkong done people during 1900-1997 when UK governed HK. HK people have never asked for true democracy, nominating candidates although UK didn't allow HK people for free election of HK leaders. Under UK governance, UK has army in HK and UK just assigned a governor to HK for dictatorship. Come on, HK, what you have done for your freedom at that time.

UK didn't build democracy for HK in the past 100 years, and China has agreed to realize democracy in HK in 2017, which is much better thing. China just asked for approval for the candidate , it is OK since HK is part of China anyway. Look at all democracy in the world, there are seldom candidates nominated by civilians.


by: Adam9 from: Dong Nai, Vietnam
June 29, 2014 12:56 PM
If we did something like this in Vietnam we would get arrested and locked up for sure.

In Response

by: Adam9
June 30, 2014 7:20 PM
Awesome! About 25% of eligible voters voted.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Worldwide Photo Workshops Empower Youthi
X
Julie Taboh
January 23, 2015 11:08 PM
Last September, 20 young adults from South Sudan took part in a National Geographic Photo Camp. They are among hundreds of students from around the world who have learned how to use a camera to tell the stories of the people in their communities through the powerful medium of photography. Three camp participants talked about their experiences recently on a visit to Washington. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video Worldwide Photo Workshops Empower Youth

Last September, 20 young adults from South Sudan took part in a National Geographic Photo Camp. They are among hundreds of students from around the world who have learned how to use a camera to tell the stories of the people in their communities through the powerful medium of photography. Three camp participants talked about their experiences recently on a visit to Washington. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video US, Japan Offer Lessons as Eurozone Launches Huge Stimulus

The Euro currency has fallen sharply after the European Central Bank announced a bigger-than-expected $67 billion-a-month quantitative easing program Thursday - commonly seen as a form of printing new money. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London on whether the move might rescue the eurozone economy -- and what lessons have been learned from similar programs around the world.
Video

Video Nigerian Elections Pose Concern of Potential Conflict in 'Middle Belt'

Nigeria’s north-central state of Kaduna has long been the site of fighting between Muslims and Christians as well as between people of different ethnic groups. As the February elections approach, community and religious leaders are making plans they hope will keep the streets calm after results are announced. Chris Stein reports from the state capital, Kaduna.
Video

Video As Viewership Drops, Obama Puts His Message on YouTube

Ratings reports show President Obama’s State of the Union address this week drew the lowest number of viewers for this annual speech in 15 years. White House officials anticipated this, and the president has decided to take a non-traditional approach to getting his message out. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video S. Korean Businesses Want to End Trade Restrictions With North

Business leaders in South Korea are calling for President Park Geun-hye to ease trade restrictions with North Korea that were put in place in 2010 after the sinking of a South Korean warship.Pro-business groups argue that expanding trade and investment is not only good for business, it is also good for long-term regional peace and security. VOA’s Brian Padden reports.
Video

Video US Marching Bands Grow Into a Show of Their Own

The 2014 Super Bowl halftime show was the most-watched in history - attracting an estimated 115 million viewers. That event featured pop star Bruno Mars. But the halftime show tradition started with marching bands, which still dominate the entertainment at U.S. high school and college American football games. But as Enming Liu reports in this story narrated by Adrianna Zhang, marching bands have grown into a show of their own.
Video

Video Secular, Religious Kurds Face Off in Southeast Turkey

Turkey’s predominantly Kurdish southeast has been rocked by violence between religious and secular Kurds. Dorian Jones reports on the reasons behind the stand-off from the region's main city of Diyarbakir, which suffered the bloodiest fighting.
Video

Video Kenya: Misuse of Antibiotics Leading to Resistance by Immune System

In Kenya, the rise of drug resistant bacteria could reverse the gains made by medical science over diseases that were once treatable. Kenyans could be at risk of fatalities as a result if the power in antibiotics is not preserved. Lenny Ruvaga has more on the story from Nairobi.
Video

Video Solar-Powered Plane Getting Ready to Circumnavigate Globe

Pilots of the solar plane that already set records flying without a drop of fuel are close to making their first attempt to fly the craft around the globe. They plan to do it in 25 flying days over a five month period. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video How Experts Decide Ethiopia Has the Best Coffee

Ethiopia’s coffee has been ranked as the best in the world by an international group of coffee connoisseurs. Not surprisingly, coffee is a top export for the country. But at home it is a source of pride. Marthe van der Wolf in Addis Ababa decided to find out what makes the bean and brew so special and how experts make their determinations.
Video

Video Yazidi Refugees at Center of Political Fight Between Turkey, Kurds

The treatment of thousands of Yazidis refugees who fled to Turkey to escape attacks by Islamic State militants has become the center of a dispute between the Turkish government and the country's pro-Kurdish movement. VOA's Dorian Jones reports.
Video

Video World’s Richest 1% Forecast to Own More Than Half of Global Wealth

The combined wealth of the world's richest 1 percent will overtake that of the remaining 99 percent at some point in 2016, according to the anti-poverty charity Oxfam. Campaigners are demanding that policymakers take action to address the widening gap between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’, as Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More

All About America

AppleAndroid