News / Asia

Asian Students Ace Global Education Test

Students attend class at Pengying School on the outskirts of Beijing, Nov. 11, 2013.
Students attend class at Pengying School on the outskirts of Beijing, Nov. 11, 2013.
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Students from Asian countries have outranked others worldwide in a test of high school students conducted every three years.  The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says 15-year-olds in Shanghai, China and Singapore scored the highest in math.  

The Program for International Student Assessment tested more than half a million students in 65 countries - on math, reading and science.

Asian countries outperformed the rest of the world in math, with the United States scoring below average, with no change from previous testing.  

In fact, the 15-year-olds in Shanghai scored the equivalent of two-and-a-half years of schooling above the top U.S. students.

Top Performers in Math

China
Singapore
Hong Kong
Taiwan
South Korea

Top Performers in Reading

China
Hong Kong
Singapore
Japan
South Korea

Top Performers in Science

China
Hong Kong
Singapore
Japan
Finland

Source PISA 2012
The highest math scores were in Shanghai, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taipei, and South Korea, followed by Macao, Japan, Liechtenstein, Belgium and Switzerland.  Organizers attribute higher scores to parental involvement, better teachers and higher expectations.
 
Jenny Jung has attended schools in South Korea and the United States.  She says her classes in South Korea lasted from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. and were often followed by tutoring.

"It’s very competitive there because it’s a relative grading system, so instead of here, where it’s an absolute grading system, where if you get over a 90, you get an A.  If you get over an 80, you get a B.  But in Korea, only like the top percentages can get an A," said Jung.

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan would like to increase early childhood education and attract quality teachers.

"Virtually every one of the high performing nations attracts their teachers from the top 30 percent of the college graduating class and many from the top 10 percent," said Duncan.

Duncan called on policy makers to make the right choices.

Cover of the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment.Cover of the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment.
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Cover of the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment.
Cover of the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment.
"We know intellectually what the right thing is to do.  What we have lacked is the political will and the sense of urgency to take education to the next level," he said.

But the study shows money might not be the only answer.  The U.S. already spends $115,000 per student, which is more than most countries.  Yet students in the Slovak Republic, which spends less than half that amount, scored near the same level.

Angel Gurria, the secretary general of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, warns the United States of consequences if the scores do not rise.

"It shows that we have a lot of homework.  It shows that somebody else is doing much better than us and if this continues, over the years, they are going to take away our cheese.  Because this translates into productivity, it translates into competitiveness, it translates into exports, it translates into jobs, it translates into well-being.  So this is not about just comparing the grades of students," said Gurria.

Critics fault the study for comparing small regions of the world to large countries.  They also say the test lacks an assessment of creative and critical thinking, something Brazilian Amanda Peixoto noticed after starting her junior year in the United States.

"They here don’t teach you how to think.  They teach you how to respect the rules, they tell you something, and you answer, they tell you and you copy; they don’t teach you how to think," said Peixoto.

The one area in which U.S. students bested their peers was confidence in their math abilities.  The challenge for educators is to reflect that confidence in their test scores.

Carolyn Presutti

Carolyn Presutti is an award-winning television reporter who works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters.  She has won an Emmy, many Associated Press awards, and a Clarion for her coverage of Haiti,  national politics, the southern economy, and the 9/11 bombing anniversary.  In 2013, Carolyn aired exclusive stories on the Syrian medical crisis and the Asiana plane crash, and was VOA’s chief reporter from the Boston Marathon bombing.

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Comments
     
by: Angela from: Illinois
December 04, 2013 9:44 AM
More than a reflection of the state of our education system, this article is a reflection on the state of our world. Competition at any level is good when it helps you improve yourself. It is unhealthy when no matter what you do you are not happy with yourself. Basing a whole national education policy on test scores in a few areas does not take the whole person into consideration. Teachers are educating children not clones making up a nation's economic army!

Raising the bar on expectations is a good thing as long as you understand the whole person within the whole picture. Are we raising healthy happy children in mind,body, and spirit who have integrity and will help shape the future of their countries and our planet into a place of true prosperity, not just produce fuel for the growing fire of the global economy? These and other critical questions are what we need to address not just how do we raise our math test scores.


by: D from: usa
December 03, 2013 11:33 PM
I'm a teacher, and in public school, a "D" is a pass. We have no say in this. They can progress to the next grade without even knowing how to read. The U.S. deserves a low score. Sad.


by: Annette Gordon from: United States
December 03, 2013 11:15 PM
Very insightful. We havd much ground t cover people, if U.S. Is t keep "world leader" post. So does the U.S. Learn t cease from "swallowing a camel and straining out a gnat" mind set? How do we prioritize..


by: T Hanana from: Michigan
December 03, 2013 10:04 PM
I think the reason American education is going down is because young children nowadays think you don't need school to make as they see from most celebraties.

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