News / Middle East

Assad Says Rebels Will Not Win

A grab from Addounia pro-regime Syrian TV shows Syrian President Bashar al-Assad speaking during an excerpt of an interview in Damascus, August 29, 2012.
A grab from Addounia pro-regime Syrian TV shows Syrian President Bashar al-Assad speaking during an excerpt of an interview in Damascus, August 29, 2012.
VOA News
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad says opposition fighters will not be victorious in their fight against the government, but says the "doors of dialogue" remains open.

In comments, to the Egyptian weekly Al-Ahram Al-Araby for Friday publication, Assad said the armed groups exercising terrorism against the state are not popular within society.

The president commented as Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan called the Syrian president "politically dead." Speaking to The Washington Post, Erdogan said he feels that Iran, China and Russia - all allies of the Syrian government - also believe Assad will go but have questions about what will come after the Syrian president leaves.

Meanwhile, a Syrian rights group reports the Syrian government continues to bombard several northern areas.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported fighting between rebel and regime forces in northeastern Aleppo Friday. Explosions were reported in and around the capital, Damascus, and shelling was reported in Homs province.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says 250 people were killed in fighting across the country on Thursday, including 165 unarmed civilians, 34 rebel fighters, 5 defected soldiers, and 46 regular soldiers.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has said the government and the opposition in Syria appear determined to resolve the crisis militarily. Ban said Syria will be a top issue as he meets with world leaders at the U.N. General Assembly, saying they must urgently address the situation.

You May Like

Reports of Mass Murder on Mediterranean Smuggler’s Boat

Boat sailed from Libya with 750 migrants aboard and arrived in Italy with 569 More

Video New Thailand Hotline Targets Misbehaving Monks

Officials say move aims to restore country’s image of Buddhism, tarnished by recent high profile scandals such as opulent lifestyle, drug and alcohol abuse, as well as child sex abuse More

Study: Dust from Sahara Helped Form Bahama Islands

What does the Sahara have in common with a Caribbean island? Quite a lot, researchers say More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Godwin from: Nigeria
September 21, 2012 12:16 PM
It cannot be the other way round. It has to be reiterated that the
Arab Spring as started in Tunisia, spreading through Egypt and some of Middle Eastern countries, has not been a good omen. It has only reflected a return to barbarism and prehistoric, or at best medieval Machiavelli in which the winner takes it all. It is a return to brutish power of jungle justice in which laws can be executed by anyone anywhere and any time when they feel certain laws have been violated. It is a return to a system of punishing offenders without a fair trial or chance to defend self. Everyone has seen the failure of the system in Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, and Libya, yet everyone seems to prefer it to the more humane leaders whose only fault is they have stayed 'too long', which is only a way of using the psyche of the West to achieve their motive of total islamization of the areas they have designated to take over.


by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
September 21, 2012 9:15 AM
Assad can afford to be cocky now that Iran has military advisers bolstering his army, and the Russians are speeding up the delivery of more weapons to him. On the other had, rumors that thousands of foreign jihadists have joined various rebel groups have discredited the rebels. The rebels are viewed now as "unknowns who-is-who" fighters with an unknown agenda, and they have committed some atrocities that alienated many Syrians. The aphorism of William and Ariel Durant "The rebels of today are the tyrants of tomorrow" seems to have aroused some suspicion about the rebels in the West , as well as in the Arab states that supported the anti-Assad drive.

I hate to think that after all the destruction, the bloodshed, and the hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees into Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq, Assad is bragging that he is not going anywhere. I believe the U.S., Saudi Arabia and Qatar should organize, train and equip special Syrian rebel units with Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and anit-tank missiles to cut Assad's air and tank advantage. Without neutralizing Assad's air force and heavy armor, the rebels cannot overthrow Assad only with AK-47s and some RPGs. It is time for the West and the Gulf States to step up the help to the rebels, bust Assad's bravado, and end the brutish 40-years Assad family control of the Syrian people. We own this to history and to our conscience! Nikos Retsos, retired professor

In Response

by: Anonymous
September 21, 2012 11:44 AM
In Fact , there are terrorists sent them the Gulf states for get down the president of Syria cause if he fallen there are advantages from that , also how these Rebels got the modernest weapons ?! this Question I keep asking myself how ,,, also there is 35% of the Rebels are foreign why they are there in Syria. we know the truth ,STOP lying anymore , We Are Not That Stupid like before .

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Astronauts Train in Underwater Labi
X
George Putic
July 25, 2014 7:25 PM
In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Not Even Monks Spared From Thailand’s Junta-Backed Morality Push

With Thailand’s military government firmly in control after May’s bloodless coup, authorities are carrying out plans they say are aimed at restoring discipline, morality and patriotism to all Thais. The measures include a crackdown on illegal gambling, education reforms to promote students’ moral development, and a new 24-hour phone hotline for citizens to report misbehaving monks. Steve Sandford reports from Bangkok.
Video

Video Virtual Program Teaches Farming Skills

In a fast-changing world beset by unpredictable climate conditions, farmers cannot afford to ignore new technology. Researchers in Australia are developing an online virtual world program to share information about climate change and more sustainable farming techniques for sugar cane growers. As VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports, the idea is to create a wider support network for farmers.
Video

Video Airline Expert: Missile will Show Signature on Debris

The debris field from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is spread over a 21-kilometer radius in eastern Ukraine. It is expected to take investigators months to sort through the airplane pieces to learn about the missile that brought down the jetliner and who fired it. VOAs Carolyn Presutti explains how this work will be done.
Video

Video Treatment for Childhood Epilepsy Heats up Medical Marijuana Debate

In the United States, marijuana is classed as an illegal drug by the federal government. But nearly half the states have legalized it, to some degree. Proponents say some strains of marijuana might have exceptional health benefits, for treating pain or inflammation in chronic conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Shelley Schlender reports on a strain of medical marijuana developed in Colorado that is reputed to reduce seizures in childhood epilepsy
Video

Video Airbus Adds Metal 3D Printed Parts to New Jets

By the end of this year, European aircraft manufacturing consortium Airbus plans to deliver the first of its new, extra-wide-body passenger jets, the A350-XWB. Among other technological innovations, the new plane will also incorporate metal parts made in a 3-D printer. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video AIDS Conference Welcomes Exciting Developments in HIV Treatment, Prevention

Significant strides have been made in recent years toward the treatment and prevention of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This year, at the International AIDS Conference, the AIDS community welcomed progress on a new pill that may prevent transmission of the deadly virus. VOA’s Anita Powell reports from Melbourne, Australia.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

AppleAndroid