News / Middle East

Assad Says Rebels Will Not Win

A grab from Addounia pro-regime Syrian TV shows Syrian President Bashar al-Assad speaking during an excerpt of an interview in Damascus, August 29, 2012.
A grab from Addounia pro-regime Syrian TV shows Syrian President Bashar al-Assad speaking during an excerpt of an interview in Damascus, August 29, 2012.
VOA News
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad says opposition fighters will not be victorious in their fight against the government, but says the "doors of dialogue" remains open.

In comments, to the Egyptian weekly Al-Ahram Al-Araby for Friday publication, Assad said the armed groups exercising terrorism against the state are not popular within society.

The president commented as Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan called the Syrian president "politically dead." Speaking to The Washington Post, Erdogan said he feels that Iran, China and Russia - all allies of the Syrian government - also believe Assad will go but have questions about what will come after the Syrian president leaves.

Meanwhile, a Syrian rights group reports the Syrian government continues to bombard several northern areas.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported fighting between rebel and regime forces in northeastern Aleppo Friday. Explosions were reported in and around the capital, Damascus, and shelling was reported in Homs province.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says 250 people were killed in fighting across the country on Thursday, including 165 unarmed civilians, 34 rebel fighters, 5 defected soldiers, and 46 regular soldiers.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has said the government and the opposition in Syria appear determined to resolve the crisis militarily. Ban said Syria will be a top issue as he meets with world leaders at the U.N. General Assembly, saying they must urgently address the situation.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
September 21, 2012 12:16 PM
It cannot be the other way round. It has to be reiterated that the
Arab Spring as started in Tunisia, spreading through Egypt and some of Middle Eastern countries, has not been a good omen. It has only reflected a return to barbarism and prehistoric, or at best medieval Machiavelli in which the winner takes it all. It is a return to brutish power of jungle justice in which laws can be executed by anyone anywhere and any time when they feel certain laws have been violated. It is a return to a system of punishing offenders without a fair trial or chance to defend self. Everyone has seen the failure of the system in Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, and Libya, yet everyone seems to prefer it to the more humane leaders whose only fault is they have stayed 'too long', which is only a way of using the psyche of the West to achieve their motive of total islamization of the areas they have designated to take over.


by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
September 21, 2012 9:15 AM
Assad can afford to be cocky now that Iran has military advisers bolstering his army, and the Russians are speeding up the delivery of more weapons to him. On the other had, rumors that thousands of foreign jihadists have joined various rebel groups have discredited the rebels. The rebels are viewed now as "unknowns who-is-who" fighters with an unknown agenda, and they have committed some atrocities that alienated many Syrians. The aphorism of William and Ariel Durant "The rebels of today are the tyrants of tomorrow" seems to have aroused some suspicion about the rebels in the West , as well as in the Arab states that supported the anti-Assad drive.

I hate to think that after all the destruction, the bloodshed, and the hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees into Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq, Assad is bragging that he is not going anywhere. I believe the U.S., Saudi Arabia and Qatar should organize, train and equip special Syrian rebel units with Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and anit-tank missiles to cut Assad's air and tank advantage. Without neutralizing Assad's air force and heavy armor, the rebels cannot overthrow Assad only with AK-47s and some RPGs. It is time for the West and the Gulf States to step up the help to the rebels, bust Assad's bravado, and end the brutish 40-years Assad family control of the Syrian people. We own this to history and to our conscience! Nikos Retsos, retired professor

In Response

by: Anonymous
September 21, 2012 11:44 AM
In Fact , there are terrorists sent them the Gulf states for get down the president of Syria cause if he fallen there are advantages from that , also how these Rebels got the modernest weapons ?! this Question I keep asking myself how ,,, also there is 35% of the Rebels are foreign why they are there in Syria. we know the truth ,STOP lying anymore , We Are Not That Stupid like before .

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