News / Africa

AU Lifts Mali Suspension, Discusses Military Intervention

— The African Union Peace and Security Council has lifted Mali’s suspension from the pan-African organization. The AU also discussed deploying an African-led international military force in Mali.
 
Extreme Islamic groups, led by the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad, or NMLA, occupied the northern part of Mali in January.  The crisis in Mali intensified when a group of soldiers staged a coup in March -- one month before the country's presidential elections.  Mali was then suspended from the African Union.
 
The AU commissioner of the Peace and Security Council, Ramtane Lamamra, announced that progress had been made in recent months by Mali, including the establishment of a national unity government in August.

“In this context, the council decides to lift the suspension of Mali’s participation in the activities of the AU, which is therefore invited to resume its full participation to all meetings and activities of the African Union,” Lamamra said.

 The high level meeting at African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa included discussion of how an African-led international military force would be deployed in Mali.
 
The military force will be a combined effort by the AU, the United Nations, Mali, and the Economic Community of West African States, or ECOWAS, and the European Union.  ECOWAS says it will contribute some 3,200 troops to the effort.
 
AU Commissioner Lamamra said Mali will need to take several steps before the bloc submits the request for military action to the United Nations Security Council next month.

“First, enhance coherence amongst the transitional institutions in order to facilitate the implementation of the two main transitional tasks, namely restoration of the state authority of the northern part of the country, and the organization of free, fair and transparent elections in the first quarter of next year,” Ramamre said.

Mali was asked to submit a detailed plan on these issues.  The AU Peace and Security Council also requested a framework for negotiations with armed groups in the north that are willing to engage in dialogue.
 
African Union chairperson Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma emphasized the AU's commitment to assist Mali in resolving the crisis.

“We will also work hand in hand with those concerned to address the long-term challenges facing the Sahel region.  In this respect, the AU is taking steps to open an office in Bamako and to strengthen presence elsewhere in the region.  I will also be appointing a high representative to Mali," Dlamini-Zuma said.

A four-day conference in Bamako to finalize a concept for the deployment of military troops in Mali is expected to begin October 30.
 
The AU Peace and Security Council also discussed the outstanding issues between Sudan and South Sudan.  The neighboring countries signed nine agreements in September, related to economic and oil issues.  But no agreement was reached on matters such as the Abyei region and disputed border areas.
 
The two countries have been given six weeks to reach consensus on the Abyei region under facilitation of the AU High-Level Implementation panel.  Within two weeks, the two countries will need to reach an agreement on how they will proceed with negotiations on the five disputed border areas.

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Achonu Sampson
October 26, 2012 6:56 AM
The UN, the AU, the ECOWAS, and the Mali community have legal ground in resolving the political instability facing Mali. The European Union (EU) have no legal ground in interfering with the matters of that country. One may say that the EU have what it takes to resolve the situation, which is obviously the truth for now, but in the execution of justice and in the pursuit of what is right, certain ethical codes which centers upon integrity, respect, and domain definition must be considered.

Therefore, with all due respect, I think, the EU should maintain their boundary; Mali is in West Africa and not in Europe. Further, how many times have the AU interfered with the affairs of any European country? Let us avoid bullying and embrace respect; nothing last forever but peace and respect ensure the continual existence of anything.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid