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Aung San Suu Kyi Receives US Congressional Gold Medal

Aung San Suu Kyi Receives US Congressional Gold Medali
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Carolyn Presutti
September 20, 2012 10:53 AM
The United States on Wednesday gave one of its highest awards to Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. The Burmese democracy activist is in the midst of a 17-day visit to the U.S. -- her first in more than 40 years. VOA's Carolyn Presutti takes us along with her, from the Capitol Rotunda to the White House.

Aung San Suu Kyi Receives US Congressional Gold Medal

Cindy Saine
— Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has received the Congressional Gold Medal - the highest honor Congress can bestow, at a ceremony Wednesday in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. Later she met with President Obama at the White House.

Members of the U.S. Congress from both chambers and both major political parties gathered to pay tribute to Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who was first awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2008, while she was under 15 years of house arrest in Burma.  On Wednesday, she was in the Capitol Rotunda in person, surrounded by congressional leaders, to receive the honor.

Republican Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell has been a strong advocate of Suu Kyi and the democracy movement in Burma for almost two decades.

"And it is impossible today, all these years later, not to be moved by the thought, that this most unlikely of revolutionaries may yet witness the deepest longing of her heart," said McConnell.

An emotional Republican Senator John McCain thanked Suu Kyi for teaching him about courage.

"I consider myself very fortunate to have lived to see this day and to know the people of Burma, whose dignity and rights Aung San Suu Kyi has sacrificed so much to defend, and will one day be free to live with dignity and justice and hope," said McCain.

-The United States' highest civilian award
-Aung San Suu Kyi was awarded the medal in 2008, while under house arrest in Burma, for her leadership and commitment to human rights
-The first Congressional Gold Medal recipient was George Washington, the first U.S. president, in 1776
-Other recent recipients include India's Mother Teresa, Pope John Paul, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Reverend Martin Luther King
Many of the lawmakers who spoke mentioned the great personal sacrifices Aung San Suu Kyi made for the cause she believed in.  Burma's military junta separated her from her family and she was not even permited to visit her husband when he was dying of cancer.

But Wednesday was more a day of joy, and former First Lady Laura Bush celebrated the triumph of the democratic reforms Burma has launched over the past two years.

"The transition in Burma, like past events in South Africa or Eastern Europe, shows that history has a hopeful direction.  It is capable of miracles.  There is a part of every soul that longs for freedom and any government built on opression is built on sand," said Laura Bush.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton emphasized that Suu Kyi was not content just to remain a symbol of democracy, an icon, but is continuing the fight as a member of parliament in Burma.

"It is almost too delicious to believe, my friend, that you are here in the Rotunda of our great Capitol, the centerpiece of our democracy, as an elected member of your parliament," said Clinton.

After all the praise heaped upon her, Suu Kyi was soft-spoken in her response.

"This is one of the most moving days of my life, to be here in a house undivided, a house joined together to welcome a stranger from a distant land.  Yet I do not feel myself to be a stranger, for I see many familiar faces, and faces that are new to me but known through what they have done for my country and for our cause," said Aung San Suu Kyi.

Aung San Suu Kyi Talks Burma Reforms With VOAi
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Carolyn Presutti
September 19, 2012 1:00 PM
Burmese democracy advocate Aung San Suu Kyi has begun a two-week visit to the United States, including a stop at VOA in Washington for an exclusive interview. VOA's Carolyn Presutti takes us along on her first day in the US in more than 40 years.
 
Aung San Suu Kyi's tour of the United StatesAung San Suu Kyi's tour of the United States
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Aung San Suu Kyi's tour of the United States
Aung San Suu Kyi's tour of the United States

During her visit to the United States, Suu Kyi has said she supports the easing of the remaining U.S. sanctions against Burma. 

On Wednesday, while she was the Capitol, the U.S. Treasury Department announced that sanctions against Burmese President Thein Sein and the speaker of the lower house of parliamentart Thura Shwe Mann have been lifted.

  • Burma's democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at the Los Angeles Convention Center in Los Angeles, California, October 2, 2012.
  • Burmese opposition leader speaks at the University of San Francisco after receiving an honorary doctorate degree, San Francisco, California, September 29, 2012.
  • Nobel laureate holds the Vaclav Havel Prize for Creative Dissent at the Human Rights Foundation's first San Francisco Freedom Forum in San Francisco, California, September 28, 2012.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi addresses a gathering at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, September 27, 2012.
  • Burmese democracy leader receives a traditional Chin shawl before speaking in Fort Wayne, Indiana, September 25, 2012.
  • An infant in the audience wears the flag of Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy as the Burmese pro-democracy leader speaks in Fort Wayne, Indiana, September 25, 2012.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi receives an award from U.S. Representative Joseph Crowley (L) at Queens College in New York, September 22, 2012.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi, chairperson of Burma's National League for Democracy, receives a Global Citizen Award from IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde during third annual Global Citizen Awards Dinner in New York, September 21, 2012.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi signs the guest book of UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the United Nations in New York, September 21, 2012.
  • Burma's opposition leader receives the National Endowment for Democracy award from Carl Gershman (L), President of the National Endowment for Democracy, and former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright during a ceremony in Washington, September 20, 2012.
  • Burma's recipients of the National Endowment for Democracy award (L-R) Aung San Suu Kyi, Khun Htun Oo, Aung Din, Dr Cynthia Maung and Kyaw Thu, during a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, September 20, 2012.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Aung San Suu Kyi in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., September 19, 2012.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi holds her Congressional Gold Medal after it was presented to her by House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) (2nd L), at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., September 19, 2012.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi meets with Senators (L-R) John Kerry (D-MA), Mitch McConnell (R-KY), Harry Reid (D-NV), Jim Webb (D-VA), and Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., September 19, 2012.
  • Burma's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi at the Voice of America, September 18, 2012 (Neeta Maskey Torrini/VOA)
  • Aung San Suu Kyi is presented with the Global Vision Award by Asia Society trustee Tom Freston at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C., September 18, 2012.
  • U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) introduces Burma's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to speak at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C., September 18, 2012.

Related Video courtesy - VOA Carolyn Presutti

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: jason from: Cambodia
September 20, 2012 10:44 AM
After reforming politics, Burmese people will be closer and closer to knowing democracy. Congratulation Suu Kyi


by: hane from: dakar
September 20, 2012 4:54 AM
I love her courage, good luck

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