News / Asia

Australia Slams Russia's ‘Retaliatory’ Sanctions

FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.
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FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.
FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.
Phil Mercer

Australia has issued a stern statement following Russia’s decision to impose sanctions on a range of western countries.

In Canberra, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop called it “disappointing” that Russia has not addressed international concerns over its support of rebels in eastern Ukraine and its annexation of Crimea.

Moscow’s sanctions on agricultural products are targeting mainly the United States and the European Union, but the punitive measures also affect other nations, including Australia, Canada and Norway.
 
Canberra has previously imposed a range of sanctions against Russia over its support of pro-Russian separatists in the conflict in Ukraine. Among them is a travel ban.  Now Moscow has responded with trade sanctions that will last a year.
 
In a statement, Australia’s foreign minister, Julie Bishop, said it was “disappointing” that Russia had imposed sanctions, rather than take decisive action to stop the supply of heavy weapons to separatists, including missile systems “believed to have been used in the downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17.”
 
Australia Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce says the government will do what it can to minimize the impact of trade restrictions on farmers.  “The Australian people have a right to make a statement about what they see as an action that is wrong. And Mr. Medvedev has a different view and that's his right and he has a responsibility to the Russian people. And we have a responsibility to the Australian people.  And I know that this is something that is going to cause a bit of hardship in the country for rural producers but we will try our very best to work around it and find alternate markets,” she stated.
 
Australia exports more than $370 million in agricultural products to Russia each year, including beef, butter and live animals.
 
Overall, two-way trade between Australia and Russia in 2013 was worth about $1.65 billion.
 
In a fiery news conference Friday, Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott accused Russia of trying to bully Ukraine.  Mr. Abbott said if President Vladimir Putin wanted to be regarded as a world leader “instead of an international outcast” he had to order his forces not to intervene in the Ukrainian conflict.
 
The prime minister also said that Australia is considering strengthening its own sanctions against Russia.

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by: William Li from: Canada
August 10, 2014 11:40 PM
Australia just shoot it's own toe, how stupid.
Europe will surfer more when winter is coming. Sure Russia will cut the gas and let Germany taste the cold!
China should be happy now because more oil and gas is going to her direction and Russia will rely on Chinese products to replace those from Europe and Aussie.
Seems China will become the number one super power even sooner! Russia and America just keep fighting, don't stop please!

by: Andrew Polar from: Atlanta, GA, USA
August 10, 2014 3:49 AM
I wonder which sanctions Australia imposed on Rwanda, where 1,000,000 people were slaughtered or to countries where Christians are sentenced to death in court. Did they also imposed sanctions on Turkey for Cyprus occupation. For those who forgot I remind that some Ukrainian regions where 70% of populations are Russians declared independence. They do not kill Christians or Jews or Greeks (like Turkey in Cyprus war). Hamas wants to kill all Jews, Al-Qeyda wants to kill all Americans, Donetsk just don't want to be part of Ukraine any more and people of Australia who never been there decided for them that Ukraine is a beautiful country and its president is nice gentleman and people of Donetsk are making mistake. This is matter of preference. They want to leave Ukraine and Russia help them in this matter. To me, it is not as bad as to slaughter 1,000,000 people in Rwanda. Both Donetsk and Russia may be wrong, but it is not the reason to impose the sanctions.

by: michael from: Odessa, Ukraine
August 09, 2014 4:11 PM
Mr Putin needs the Dondass region , period !!! This has nothing to do with the sepratists !! SEPRATISTS ??? Does anyone have a clue what they are talking about ?? Ask People in Mariupol where the SEPRATISTS came from and no one will be able to tell you. They all say I guess Russia because the only locals that are fighting are the one released from prison to fight against Ukraine. Russian Language ?? Putin is a liar he has used the excuse Native Russian Speakers a few times. Russia wants no peace !! Russia wants the Dondass , Lugansk regions for a route to Crimea and then he will try to take Odessa. RUSSIANS believe everythin that Putin says or does. The news service in Russia is controlled by the Russian government (Putin) (Facist). Russian television is a comical joke. I would have to drinl 2 liters of Vodka to even start to believe what they say. Russian television is now banned in many countries. THE ONLY THING RUSSIANS UNDERSTAND ARE CRUISE MISSLES INBOUND TO MOSCOW. The games will stop with only a show of force and nothing else. WAKE UP PEOPLE !!!! pUTIN IS NOT A GOOD GUY

by: Ivan
August 09, 2014 2:19 PM
"missile systems “believed to have been used in the downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17.” Can you hear what you yourself are saying for once in a while? Believed-to-Have-Been-Used-in-the... Still a little, and you will lose your native language behind all this lie.

by: Persio from: NYC
August 09, 2014 12:31 PM
So it's okay for Russia to invade a sovereign nation and take land whenever they feel and send weapons to rebels that are acting like bandits and take over illegally? Since some here think an eye for an eye when it comes to sanctions then I guess we can go ahead and claim land that is not ours just like the Russians did.

by: Kc from: USA
August 09, 2014 12:23 PM
Australia minister should praise the skills and brave of Russia of invasions, sanctions,... as they praise the skills of japs killings and invasions in the entire Asia in WW2.

by: danny warson from: san jose costa rica
August 09, 2014 6:47 AM
heee...heeas long "we" have support from IQ 36 politicos we safe? heee...hee...WdaF is wrong with chicken brains!!!!

by: Patrick from: USA
August 09, 2014 4:34 AM
Good for you Australia, your plane was shot down by this needless war!

by: Aussis from: USA
August 09, 2014 12:59 AM
Well factually the Australian citizens DO NOT care about Ukraine. - it is the Politicians that are making the statements. So now your farmers are going to be hit financially because your a bunch of idiots !

by: rodger olsen from: usa
August 08, 2014 11:02 PM
I'm, sorry, but what did she expect? That Russia would cower and beg "don't hit old Russia agin' Massa. Russia be good Massa." Neither Ukraine nor Crimea was any business of Australia, but smacking a trading partner is begging for a return hit. Russia does not cower and doesn't care about other people opinions of it.
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